Exercise program improved subjective dry eye symptoms for office workers

Kokoro Sano, Motoko Kawashima, Sayuri Takechi, Masaru Mimura, Kazuo Tsubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: We investigated the benefits of a cognitive behavior therapy-based exercise program to reduce the dry eye symptoms of office workers. Materials and methods: We recruited 11 office workers with dry eye symptoms, aged 31–64 years, who voluntarily participated in group health guidance at a manufacturing company. Participants learned about the role of physical activity and exercise in enhancing wellness and performed an exercise program at home 3 days per week for 10 weeks. We estimated the indexes of body composition, dry eye symptoms, and psychological distress using the Dry Eye-Related Quality of Life Score and the World Health Organization’s Subjective Well-Being Inventory questionnaires pre- and postintervention. Results: The 10-week exercise program and the questionnaires were completed by 48.1% (39 of 81) of the participants. Body composition did not change pre- and postintervention. However, the average of the Dry Eye-Related Quality of Life Score scores in participants with subjective dry eye significantly improved after the intervention. Moreover, the World Health Organization’s Subjective Well-Being Inventory positive well-being score tended to increase after the intervention. Conclusion: In this study, we showed that a 10-week exercise program improved subjective dry eye symptoms of healthy office workers. Our study suggests that a cognitive behavior therapy-based exercise program can play an important role in the treatment of patients with dry eye disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-311
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Ophthalmology
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Feb 9

Fingerprint

Exercise
Cognitive Therapy
Body Composition
Quality of Life
Equipment and Supplies
Eye Diseases
Psychology
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Dry eye
  • Exercise
  • Office workers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Exercise program improved subjective dry eye symptoms for office workers. / Sano, Kokoro; Kawashima, Motoko; Takechi, Sayuri; Mimura, Masaru; Tsubota, Kazuo.

In: Clinical Ophthalmology, Vol. 12, 09.02.2018, p. 307-311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sano, Kokoro ; Kawashima, Motoko ; Takechi, Sayuri ; Mimura, Masaru ; Tsubota, Kazuo. / Exercise program improved subjective dry eye symptoms for office workers. In: Clinical Ophthalmology. 2018 ; Vol. 12. pp. 307-311.
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