Exposure to hardly soluble indium compounds in ITO production and recycling plants is a new risk for interstitial lung damage

T. Hamaguchi, K. Omae, Toru Takebayashi, Y. Kikuchi, N. Yoshioka, Y. Nishiwaki, A. Tanaka, M. Hirata, O. Taguchi, T. Chonan

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Abstract

Objectives: To identify the effects of indium on the lung and to assess exposure-effect and exposure-response relations between indium exposure and effects on the lungs. Methods: Ninety three male indium exposed and 93 male non-exposed workers from four ITO manufacturing or ITO recycling plants were analysed in a cross-sectional study. Indium in serum (In-S) was determined as a biological exposure index. Geometric means (GSD) of In-S were 8.25 ng/ml (4.55) in the exposed workers and 0.25 (2.64) in the non-exposed workers. The maximum concentration of In-S was 116.9 ng/ml. A questionnaire for respiratory symptoms and job histories, spirometry, high-resolution computerised tomography (HRCT) of the chest, serum KL-6, serum SP-A, serum SP-D and serum CRP were measured as the effect indices. Results: Spirometry, subjective symptoms and the prevalence of interstitial or emphysematous changes on lung HRCT showed no differences between exposed and non-exposed workers. Geometric means (GSD) of KL-6, SP-D and SP-A in the exposed workers were 495.4 U/ml (2.26), 85.2 ng/ml (2.02) and 39.6 ng/ml (1.57), and were significantly higher than those in the non-exposed workers. The prevalence (%) of the exposed and non-exposed workers exceeding the reference values were also significantly higher in KL-6 (41.9 vs 2.2), SP-D (39.8 vs 7.5), and SP-A (43.0 vs 24.7). Very sharp exposure-effect and exposure-response relations were discovered between In-S and KL-6 and between In-S and SP-D when the exposed workers were classified into seven groups by In-S. Conclusions: The study outcomes with regard to the basis of serum immunochemistry biomarkers and HRCT indicate that exposure to hardly soluble indium compound dust may represent a risk for interstitial lung damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-55
Number of pages5
JournalOccupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume65
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jan

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indium
Indium
Recycling
serum
recycling
Lung
damage
Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D
Serum
tomography
Spirometry
Tomography
exposure
Immunochemistry
Dust
biomarker
Reference Values
manufacturing
Thorax
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Environmental Science(all)

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Exposure to hardly soluble indium compounds in ITO production and recycling plants is a new risk for interstitial lung damage. / Hamaguchi, T.; Omae, K.; Takebayashi, Toru; Kikuchi, Y.; Yoshioka, N.; Nishiwaki, Y.; Tanaka, A.; Hirata, M.; Taguchi, O.; Chonan, T.

In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 65, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 51-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hamaguchi, T, Omae, K, Takebayashi, T, Kikuchi, Y, Yoshioka, N, Nishiwaki, Y, Tanaka, A, Hirata, M, Taguchi, O & Chonan, T 2008, 'Exposure to hardly soluble indium compounds in ITO production and recycling plants is a new risk for interstitial lung damage', Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 51-55. https://doi.org/10.1136/oem.2006.029124
Hamaguchi, T. ; Omae, K. ; Takebayashi, Toru ; Kikuchi, Y. ; Yoshioka, N. ; Nishiwaki, Y. ; Tanaka, A. ; Hirata, M. ; Taguchi, O. ; Chonan, T. / Exposure to hardly soluble indium compounds in ITO production and recycling plants is a new risk for interstitial lung damage. In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 65, No. 1. pp. 51-55.
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AU - Hamaguchi, T.

AU - Omae, K.

AU - Takebayashi, Toru

AU - Kikuchi, Y.

AU - Yoshioka, N.

AU - Nishiwaki, Y.

AU - Tanaka, A.

AU - Hirata, M.

AU - Taguchi, O.

AU - Chonan, T.

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N2 - Objectives: To identify the effects of indium on the lung and to assess exposure-effect and exposure-response relations between indium exposure and effects on the lungs. Methods: Ninety three male indium exposed and 93 male non-exposed workers from four ITO manufacturing or ITO recycling plants were analysed in a cross-sectional study. Indium in serum (In-S) was determined as a biological exposure index. Geometric means (GSD) of In-S were 8.25 ng/ml (4.55) in the exposed workers and 0.25 (2.64) in the non-exposed workers. The maximum concentration of In-S was 116.9 ng/ml. A questionnaire for respiratory symptoms and job histories, spirometry, high-resolution computerised tomography (HRCT) of the chest, serum KL-6, serum SP-A, serum SP-D and serum CRP were measured as the effect indices. Results: Spirometry, subjective symptoms and the prevalence of interstitial or emphysematous changes on lung HRCT showed no differences between exposed and non-exposed workers. Geometric means (GSD) of KL-6, SP-D and SP-A in the exposed workers were 495.4 U/ml (2.26), 85.2 ng/ml (2.02) and 39.6 ng/ml (1.57), and were significantly higher than those in the non-exposed workers. The prevalence (%) of the exposed and non-exposed workers exceeding the reference values were also significantly higher in KL-6 (41.9 vs 2.2), SP-D (39.8 vs 7.5), and SP-A (43.0 vs 24.7). Very sharp exposure-effect and exposure-response relations were discovered between In-S and KL-6 and between In-S and SP-D when the exposed workers were classified into seven groups by In-S. Conclusions: The study outcomes with regard to the basis of serum immunochemistry biomarkers and HRCT indicate that exposure to hardly soluble indium compound dust may represent a risk for interstitial lung damage.

AB - Objectives: To identify the effects of indium on the lung and to assess exposure-effect and exposure-response relations between indium exposure and effects on the lungs. Methods: Ninety three male indium exposed and 93 male non-exposed workers from four ITO manufacturing or ITO recycling plants were analysed in a cross-sectional study. Indium in serum (In-S) was determined as a biological exposure index. Geometric means (GSD) of In-S were 8.25 ng/ml (4.55) in the exposed workers and 0.25 (2.64) in the non-exposed workers. The maximum concentration of In-S was 116.9 ng/ml. A questionnaire for respiratory symptoms and job histories, spirometry, high-resolution computerised tomography (HRCT) of the chest, serum KL-6, serum SP-A, serum SP-D and serum CRP were measured as the effect indices. Results: Spirometry, subjective symptoms and the prevalence of interstitial or emphysematous changes on lung HRCT showed no differences between exposed and non-exposed workers. Geometric means (GSD) of KL-6, SP-D and SP-A in the exposed workers were 495.4 U/ml (2.26), 85.2 ng/ml (2.02) and 39.6 ng/ml (1.57), and were significantly higher than those in the non-exposed workers. The prevalence (%) of the exposed and non-exposed workers exceeding the reference values were also significantly higher in KL-6 (41.9 vs 2.2), SP-D (39.8 vs 7.5), and SP-A (43.0 vs 24.7). Very sharp exposure-effect and exposure-response relations were discovered between In-S and KL-6 and between In-S and SP-D when the exposed workers were classified into seven groups by In-S. Conclusions: The study outcomes with regard to the basis of serum immunochemistry biomarkers and HRCT indicate that exposure to hardly soluble indium compound dust may represent a risk for interstitial lung damage.

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