Factor in resectable non-small cell lung cancer

Masaya Yotsukura, Takashi Ohtsuka, Kaoru Kaseda, Ikuo Kamiyama, Yuichiro Hayashi, Hisao Asamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Over the past decade, the Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), which is based on serum C-reactive protein and albumin levels, has been reported to be associated with the prognosis of patients with several types of inoperable and operable cancers. However, its applicability to operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not yet been established. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from patients with pathological stage I or II NSCLC who underwent complete resection. A total of 1048 patients were categorized as either GPS-0 (n = 817 [78.0%]), GPS-1 (184 [17.6%]), or GPS-2 (47 [4.5%]). Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyze the relationship between prognosis and GPS status. Results: The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 91.2%, 78.3%, and 75.8% for GPS-0, GPS-1, and GPS-2, respectively. There were significant differences in OS between GPS-0 and GPS-1 (p < 0.001) and between GPS-0 and GPS-2 (p < 0.001). Ten variables demonstrated to be associated with OS in a univariate analysis were subjected to a multivariate analysis. The results showed that male sex (p = 0.031), vascular invasion (p < 0.001), lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001), and GPS (p = 0.025) were significantly associated with OS. Conclusions: A high GPS is significantly associated with poor OS. Although the biological mechanism that underlies this association is not clear, this inflammation-based score may be a useful indicator of the prognosis in patients with resectable NSCLC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1311-1318
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Thoracic Oncology
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Survival
Proportional Hazards Models
C-Reactive Protein
Blood Vessels
Blood Proteins
Albumins
Multivariate Analysis
Survival Rate
Lymph Nodes
Neoplasm Metastasis
Inflammation
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Inflammation
  • Lung cancer
  • Prognostic factor
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Factor in resectable non-small cell lung cancer. / Yotsukura, Masaya; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Kaseda, Kaoru; Kamiyama, Ikuo; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Asamura, Hisao.

In: Journal of Thoracic Oncology, Vol. 11, No. 8, 2016, p. 1311-1318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yotsukura, Masaya ; Ohtsuka, Takashi ; Kaseda, Kaoru ; Kamiyama, Ikuo ; Hayashi, Yuichiro ; Asamura, Hisao. / Factor in resectable non-small cell lung cancer. In: Journal of Thoracic Oncology. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 8. pp. 1311-1318.
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abstract = "Background: Over the past decade, the Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), which is based on serum C-reactive protein and albumin levels, has been reported to be associated with the prognosis of patients with several types of inoperable and operable cancers. However, its applicability to operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not yet been established. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from patients with pathological stage I or II NSCLC who underwent complete resection. A total of 1048 patients were categorized as either GPS-0 (n = 817 [78.0{\%}]), GPS-1 (184 [17.6{\%}]), or GPS-2 (47 [4.5{\%}]). Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyze the relationship between prognosis and GPS status. Results: The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 91.2{\%}, 78.3{\%}, and 75.8{\%} for GPS-0, GPS-1, and GPS-2, respectively. There were significant differences in OS between GPS-0 and GPS-1 (p < 0.001) and between GPS-0 and GPS-2 (p < 0.001). Ten variables demonstrated to be associated with OS in a univariate analysis were subjected to a multivariate analysis. The results showed that male sex (p = 0.031), vascular invasion (p < 0.001), lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001), and GPS (p = 0.025) were significantly associated with OS. Conclusions: A high GPS is significantly associated with poor OS. Although the biological mechanism that underlies this association is not clear, this inflammation-based score may be a useful indicator of the prognosis in patients with resectable NSCLC.",
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N2 - Background: Over the past decade, the Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), which is based on serum C-reactive protein and albumin levels, has been reported to be associated with the prognosis of patients with several types of inoperable and operable cancers. However, its applicability to operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not yet been established. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from patients with pathological stage I or II NSCLC who underwent complete resection. A total of 1048 patients were categorized as either GPS-0 (n = 817 [78.0%]), GPS-1 (184 [17.6%]), or GPS-2 (47 [4.5%]). Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyze the relationship between prognosis and GPS status. Results: The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 91.2%, 78.3%, and 75.8% for GPS-0, GPS-1, and GPS-2, respectively. There were significant differences in OS between GPS-0 and GPS-1 (p < 0.001) and between GPS-0 and GPS-2 (p < 0.001). Ten variables demonstrated to be associated with OS in a univariate analysis were subjected to a multivariate analysis. The results showed that male sex (p = 0.031), vascular invasion (p < 0.001), lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001), and GPS (p = 0.025) were significantly associated with OS. Conclusions: A high GPS is significantly associated with poor OS. Although the biological mechanism that underlies this association is not clear, this inflammation-based score may be a useful indicator of the prognosis in patients with resectable NSCLC.

AB - Background: Over the past decade, the Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), which is based on serum C-reactive protein and albumin levels, has been reported to be associated with the prognosis of patients with several types of inoperable and operable cancers. However, its applicability to operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not yet been established. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from patients with pathological stage I or II NSCLC who underwent complete resection. A total of 1048 patients were categorized as either GPS-0 (n = 817 [78.0%]), GPS-1 (184 [17.6%]), or GPS-2 (47 [4.5%]). Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyze the relationship between prognosis and GPS status. Results: The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 91.2%, 78.3%, and 75.8% for GPS-0, GPS-1, and GPS-2, respectively. There were significant differences in OS between GPS-0 and GPS-1 (p < 0.001) and between GPS-0 and GPS-2 (p < 0.001). Ten variables demonstrated to be associated with OS in a univariate analysis were subjected to a multivariate analysis. The results showed that male sex (p = 0.031), vascular invasion (p < 0.001), lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001), and GPS (p = 0.025) were significantly associated with OS. Conclusions: A high GPS is significantly associated with poor OS. Although the biological mechanism that underlies this association is not clear, this inflammation-based score may be a useful indicator of the prognosis in patients with resectable NSCLC.

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