Factors affecting performance of hospital infection control in Japan

Miho Sekimoto, Yuichi Imanaka, Hiroyoshi Kobayashi, Takashi Okubo, Junko Kizu, Hiroe Kobuse, Hanako Mihara, Noriaki Tsuji, Ayumi Yamaguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In Japan, hospital infection control (IC) programs are frequently underresourced, and their improvement is considered a pressing issue. Methods: In 2005, we conducted a questionnaire survey of 638 teaching hospitals (most with 300 or more beds) and 882 nonteaching hospitals (most with fewer than 300 beds) in Japan. We analyzed associations among resources, infrastructures, activities, and performance related to IC. Results: A total of 423 teaching hospitals (66.3%) and 377 nonteaching hospitals (50.2%) responded to the survey. The teaching hospitals had more IC infrastructure, such as full-time infection control practitioners (ICPs), link nurses, and infection control teams (ICTs), compared with the nonteaching hospitals. Infection surveillance was more likely to be implemented in hospitals with more ICP full-time equivalents (FTEs). IC performance scores were significantly higher in the teaching hospitals than in the nonteaching hospitals. In multivariate analyses, greater IC infrastructure, such as ICP FTEs, full-time IC nurses, and regular ICT rounds were significantly associated with IC performance. Hospital accreditation and hospital size also were significantly associated with higher IC performance scores. Conclusion: Given the strong associations found among IC infrastructure and performance, a new framework for evaluating IC infrastructure and for providing financial support may be effective in enhancing IC programs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)136-142
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Mar
Externally publishedYes

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Infection Control
Cross Infection
Japan
Infection Control Practitioners
Teaching Hospitals
Nurses
Health Facility Size
Financial Support
Accreditation
Multivariate Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Sekimoto, M., Imanaka, Y., Kobayashi, H., Okubo, T., Kizu, J., Kobuse, H., ... Yamaguchi, A. (2009). Factors affecting performance of hospital infection control in Japan. American Journal of Infection Control, 37(2), 136-142. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2008.03.005

Factors affecting performance of hospital infection control in Japan. / Sekimoto, Miho; Imanaka, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Hiroyoshi; Okubo, Takashi; Kizu, Junko; Kobuse, Hiroe; Mihara, Hanako; Tsuji, Noriaki; Yamaguchi, Ayumi.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 37, No. 2, 03.2009, p. 136-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sekimoto, M, Imanaka, Y, Kobayashi, H, Okubo, T, Kizu, J, Kobuse, H, Mihara, H, Tsuji, N & Yamaguchi, A 2009, 'Factors affecting performance of hospital infection control in Japan', American Journal of Infection Control, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 136-142. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2008.03.005
Sekimoto, Miho ; Imanaka, Yuichi ; Kobayashi, Hiroyoshi ; Okubo, Takashi ; Kizu, Junko ; Kobuse, Hiroe ; Mihara, Hanako ; Tsuji, Noriaki ; Yamaguchi, Ayumi. / Factors affecting performance of hospital infection control in Japan. In: American Journal of Infection Control. 2009 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 136-142.
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