Factors related to physical violence experienced by parents of persons with schizophrenia in Japan

Masako Kageyama, Phyllis Solomon, Sachiko Kita, Satoko Nagata, Keiko Yokoyama, Yukako Nakamura, Sayaka Kobayashi, Chiyo Fujii

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most violence by patients with mental illness is perpetuated against family members rather than the general public. However, there is insufficient research to reach a consensus on factors related to family violence for this population. Thus, the current study aimed to clarify factors related to physical violence by patients with schizophrenia towards their parents in Japan. A self-administrated survey was distributed through family groups to families with a relative with a psychiatric disorder. Questionnaires completed by 400 parents of patients with schizophrenia were analyzed. Of the 400 parents, almost two-thirds experienced “no physical violence” and close to one-third experienced “physical violence” during the past year. Results of a mixed-effects logistic regression revealed that physical violence was significantly related to the patients’ gender (female rather than male), multiple patient hospitalizations (3 or more times as compared to never hospitalized), low annual household income (less than US$20 K as compared to over US$40 K), and higher hostility and criticism of family interactions. Family violence maybe reduced through education on communication strategies for both parents and patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-445
Number of pages7
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume243
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Sep 30

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Schizophrenia
Japan
Parents
Domestic Violence
Hostility
Mentally Ill Persons
Violence
Psychiatry
Consensus
Hospitalization
Logistic Models
Communication
Physical Abuse
Education
Research
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Caregivers
  • Expressed emotion
  • Japan
  • Mental disorders
  • Schizophrenia
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Factors related to physical violence experienced by parents of persons with schizophrenia in Japan. / Kageyama, Masako; Solomon, Phyllis; Kita, Sachiko; Nagata, Satoko; Yokoyama, Keiko; Nakamura, Yukako; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Fujii, Chiyo.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 243, 30.09.2016, p. 439-445.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kageyama, M, Solomon, P, Kita, S, Nagata, S, Yokoyama, K, Nakamura, Y, Kobayashi, S & Fujii, C 2016, 'Factors related to physical violence experienced by parents of persons with schizophrenia in Japan', Psychiatry Research, vol. 243, pp. 439-445. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2016.06.036
Kageyama, Masako ; Solomon, Phyllis ; Kita, Sachiko ; Nagata, Satoko ; Yokoyama, Keiko ; Nakamura, Yukako ; Kobayashi, Sayaka ; Fujii, Chiyo. / Factors related to physical violence experienced by parents of persons with schizophrenia in Japan. In: Psychiatry Research. 2016 ; Vol. 243. pp. 439-445.
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