Familial occurrence of thyroid tumors

Kaori Kameyama, H. Takami, Y. Hosoda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 1986, familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) was recognized clinically as a distinct entity, clearly distinguished from multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN), being characterized by the development of MTC in the absence of any additional neoplasms. Ret proto-oncogene was first identified in 1985 using transformation assay. The gene was mapped to the chromosome 10, similar to MEN and FMTC, and was expressed at high levels in MTC. In 1993, ret mutations were identified in patients with MEN2A and FMTC, and many other mutations has been clarified up to today. What is the normal function of RET and how ret mutations lead to tumor formation in MEN and FMTC are focus of intensive studies at present.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2697-2701
Number of pages5
JournalNippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine
Volume53
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 1995 Nov

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Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia
Thyroid Gland
Mutation
Neoplasms
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10
Proto-Oncogenes
Familial medullary thyroid carcinoma
Genes

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Familial occurrence of thyroid tumors. / Kameyama, Kaori; Takami, H.; Hosoda, Y.

In: Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine, Vol. 53, No. 11, 11.1995, p. 2697-2701.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kameyama, K, Takami, H & Hosoda, Y 1995, 'Familial occurrence of thyroid tumors', Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine, vol. 53, no. 11, pp. 2697-2701.
Kameyama, Kaori ; Takami, H. ; Hosoda, Y. / Familial occurrence of thyroid tumors. In: Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine. 1995 ; Vol. 53, No. 11. pp. 2697-2701.
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