Fatigue and sleep among employees with prospective increase in work time control: A 1-year observational study with objective assessment

Tomohide Kubo, Masaya Takahashi, Xinxin Liu, Hiroki Ikeda, Fumiharu Togo, Akihito Shimazu, Katsutoshi Tanaka, Naoki Kamata, Yoshiko Kubo, Junko Uesugi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This observational study aimed to determine how 1-year changes in work time control (WTC) have an impact upon objectively measured fatigue and sleep among employees. Methods: Thirty-nine employees were divided into two groups according to whether or not their WTC increased from baseline to 1 year later. Psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) and wrist actigraphy were used to objectively measure fatigue and sleep, respectively. Self-reported outcomes were also measured. Results: The increased WTC group showed gradual improvements in PVT performance and sleep quality over the course of the follow-up period compared with the not-increased WTC group. Between-group differences were statistically significant for PVT lapses and tended to be significant for PVT speed after 1 year. Conclusions: A progressive increase in WTC could play a crucial role in reducing fatigue and promoting sleep among employees.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1066-1072
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume58
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Nov 28
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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