Fatigue strength and fracture mechanism of different post-fused thermal spray-coated steels with a Co-based self-fluxing alloy coating

Jeongseok Oh, Jun Komotori, Jungil Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The characteristics and adhesive strength of thermal-sprayed coatings at the interface between the coating and substrate are affected by the post-fusing treatment process. We investigated the effect of the adhesive strength on the fatigue strength and fracture mechanism of post-fused specimens. Rotating bending fatigue tests were conducted on specimens with a Co-based self-fluxing alloy coating on a medium carbon steel substrate. The post-fusing treatment was performed using a vacuum furnace, an electric furnace, or an induction heating system. A diffusion layer formed at the interface of the specimens treated in either furnace at 1100 °C for 4 h. These conditions produced a strong adhesive strength; the fatigue strength of these specimens also increased remarkably compared to the substrate-only specimens. However, the specimens treated with an induction heating system at 1100 °C for 120 s had a much lower adhesive strength since a diffusion layer was not formed, leading to delamination of the entire coating from the substrate during the first stage of the fracture process. The fatigue strength of these specimens was almost equal to that of the substrate-only specimens. Thus, thermal-sprayed coatings treated in vacuum and electric furnaces were more effective due to the formation of a diffusion layer, which contributed to improving the fatigue strength of the steel specimens. The expected maximum pore size of the coatings treated in vacuum and electric furnaces were estimated using statistics of extreme value.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1441-1447
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Fatigue
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Aug

Fingerprint

Fatigue Strength
Steel
Spray
Furnace
Coating
Vacuum furnaces
Electric furnaces
Adhesives
Coatings
Substrate
Substrates
Induction heating
Sprayed coatings
Induction Heating
Vacuum
Statistics of Extremes
Bending (deformation)
Delamination
Extreme Values
Pore size

Keywords

  • Adhesive strength
  • Fatigue strength
  • Fracture mechanism
  • Fusing treatment
  • Statistics of extreme value
  • Thermal spray

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Fatigue strength and fracture mechanism of different post-fused thermal spray-coated steels with a Co-based self-fluxing alloy coating. / Oh, Jeongseok; Komotori, Jun; Song, Jungil.

In: International Journal of Fatigue, Vol. 30, No. 8, 08.2008, p. 1441-1447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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