Feasibility and Safety of Endoscopic Ischemic Polypectomy and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Peutz–Jeghers Syndrome (with Video)

Kenji J.L. Limpias Kamiya, Naoki Hosoe, Kaoru Takabayashi, Anna Okuzawa, Hinako Sakurai, Yukie Hayashi, Ryoichi Miyanaga, Tomohisa Sujino, Haruhiko Ogata, Takanori Kanai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Peutz–Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disease with a clinical features related to gastrointestinal (GI) hamartomatous polyposis, frequently observed in the small bowel. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE) has made non-surgical treatment of GI polyps possible. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) has been performed but was associated with complications and difficulties. Recently, endoscopic ischemic polypectomy (EIP) has been developed and its usefulness reported. The study evaluated the feasibility and safety of EIP and the clinical outcomes of patients with PJS. Methods: We retrospectively collected data of consecutive patients with PJS between September 2009 and March 2021. Data regarding clinical characteristics, follow-up methods, endoscopic management, and complications were collected. EIP feasibility and safety were assessed. Results: Twenty-two patients were included. The observation period was 70 months (range, 5–153). Of the 124 therapeutic endoscopy procedures performed, 68 used BAE. Of the 607 polyps treated, 329 polyps were located in the small bowel. EIP was able to treat a greater number of polyps per patient than EMR (P < 0.003), without any complications, carcinoma, or intussusception in the small bowel (P < 0.001). During the follow-up period, 3 patients developed GI cancer. Conclusion: Long-term follow-up in patients with PJS showed that EIP was a feasible and safe technique.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Carcinoma
  • Endoscopic mucosal resection
  • Feasibility studies
  • Intussusception
  • Peutz–Jeghers syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology

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