Firm-level impacts of natural disasters on production networks: Evidence from a flood in Thailand

Kazunobu Hayakawa, Toshiyuki Matsuura, Fumihiro Okubo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores the firm-level impact of the 2011 flooding in Thailand, specifically, the impact on procurement patterns at Japanese affiliates in Thailand. We find that, first, small firms are more likely to lower their local procurement share, especially their share of procurement from other Japanese-owned firms in Thailand. Second, young firms are more likely to increase their share of imports from Japan, whereas old firms are more likely to look to China. Third, there is no impact on imports from ASEAN and other countries. These findings are useful for uncovering how multinationals adjust their production networks before and after natural disasters.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)244-259
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of the Japanese and International Economies
Volume38
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Dec 1

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Thailand
natural disaster
firm
evidence
import
ASEAN
Japan
Production networks
Natural disasters
China
Procurement
Import

Keywords

  • Flooding
  • Multinational enterprises
  • Natural disasters
  • Production networks
  • Thailand

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Finance
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Firm-level impacts of natural disasters on production networks : Evidence from a flood in Thailand. / Hayakawa, Kazunobu; Matsuura, Toshiyuki; Okubo, Fumihiro.

In: Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Vol. 38, 01.12.2015, p. 244-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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