Focal brain lesions induced with ultraviolet irradiation

Mariko Nakata, Kazuaki Nagasaka, Masayuki Shimoda, Ichiro Takashima, Shinya Yamamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lesion and inactivation methods have played important roles in neuroscience studies. However, traditional techniques for creating a brain lesion are highly invasive, and control of lesion size and shape using these techniques is not easy. Here, we developed a novel method for creating a lesion on the cortical surface via 365 nm ultraviolet (UV) irradiation without breaking the dura mater. We demonstrated that 2.0 mWh UV irradiation, but not the same amount of non-UV light irradiation, induced an inverted bell-shaped lesion with neuronal loss and accumulation of glial cells. Moreover, the volume of the UV irradiation-induced lesion depended on the UV light exposure amount. We further succeeded in visualizing the lesioned site in a living animal using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Importantly, we also observed using an optical imaging technique that the spread of neural activation evoked by adjacent cortical stimulation disappeared only at the UV-irradiated site. In summary, UV irradiation can induce a focal brain lesion with a stable shape and size in a less invasive manner than traditional lesioning methods. This method is applicable to not only neuroscientific lesion experiments but also studies of the focal brain injury recovery process.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7968
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Dec 1

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Brain
Dura Mater
Optical Imaging
Ultraviolet Rays
Neurosciences
Neuroglia
Brain Injuries
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Focal brain lesions induced with ultraviolet irradiation. / Nakata, Mariko; Nagasaka, Kazuaki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Takashima, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Shinya.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 8, No. 1, 7968, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakata, Mariko ; Nagasaka, Kazuaki ; Shimoda, Masayuki ; Takashima, Ichiro ; Yamamoto, Shinya. / Focal brain lesions induced with ultraviolet irradiation. In: Scientific Reports. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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