Foreign technology acquisition policy and firm performance in Japan, 1957-1970: Micro-aspects of industrial policy

Kozo Kiyota, Tetsuji Okazaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine the determinants and effects of technology acquisition licensing using firm-level data between 1957 and 1970. Our results indicate that in technology acquisition licensing, the government screened a firm's application based on (i) the industry that the firm belonged to and (ii) its past experience of technology acquisition. As a result, inefficient firms with considerable experience tended to acquire more technologies before deregulation. Despite this screening process, the technology acquisition policy contributes to improve a firm performance: The firms with acquired technology succeeded in capital accumulation, which results in much faster growth of labor productivity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)563-586
Number of pages24
JournalInternational Journal of Industrial Organization
Volume23
Issue number7-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Sep
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Deregulation
Industrial policy
Technology acquisition
Firm performance
Japan
Screening
Productivity
Personnel
Licensing
Industry
Firm-level data
Capital accumulation
Labour productivity
Government

Keywords

  • Industrial policy
  • Productivity
  • Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Finance

Cite this

Foreign technology acquisition policy and firm performance in Japan, 1957-1970 : Micro-aspects of industrial policy. / Kiyota, Kozo; Okazaki, Tetsuji.

In: International Journal of Industrial Organization, Vol. 23, No. 7-8, 09.2005, p. 563-586.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{81020381a90f4f098b50af820033821d,
title = "Foreign technology acquisition policy and firm performance in Japan, 1957-1970: Micro-aspects of industrial policy",
abstract = "We examine the determinants and effects of technology acquisition licensing using firm-level data between 1957 and 1970. Our results indicate that in technology acquisition licensing, the government screened a firm's application based on (i) the industry that the firm belonged to and (ii) its past experience of technology acquisition. As a result, inefficient firms with considerable experience tended to acquire more technologies before deregulation. Despite this screening process, the technology acquisition policy contributes to improve a firm performance: The firms with acquired technology succeeded in capital accumulation, which results in much faster growth of labor productivity.",
keywords = "Industrial policy, Productivity, Technology",
author = "Kozo Kiyota and Tetsuji Okazaki",
year = "2005",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijindorg.2005.03.004",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "563--586",
journal = "International Journal of Industrial Organization",
issn = "0167-7187",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "7-8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Foreign technology acquisition policy and firm performance in Japan, 1957-1970

T2 - Micro-aspects of industrial policy

AU - Kiyota, Kozo

AU - Okazaki, Tetsuji

PY - 2005/9

Y1 - 2005/9

N2 - We examine the determinants and effects of technology acquisition licensing using firm-level data between 1957 and 1970. Our results indicate that in technology acquisition licensing, the government screened a firm's application based on (i) the industry that the firm belonged to and (ii) its past experience of technology acquisition. As a result, inefficient firms with considerable experience tended to acquire more technologies before deregulation. Despite this screening process, the technology acquisition policy contributes to improve a firm performance: The firms with acquired technology succeeded in capital accumulation, which results in much faster growth of labor productivity.

AB - We examine the determinants and effects of technology acquisition licensing using firm-level data between 1957 and 1970. Our results indicate that in technology acquisition licensing, the government screened a firm's application based on (i) the industry that the firm belonged to and (ii) its past experience of technology acquisition. As a result, inefficient firms with considerable experience tended to acquire more technologies before deregulation. Despite this screening process, the technology acquisition policy contributes to improve a firm performance: The firms with acquired technology succeeded in capital accumulation, which results in much faster growth of labor productivity.

KW - Industrial policy

KW - Productivity

KW - Technology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=24644496640&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=24644496640&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijindorg.2005.03.004

DO - 10.1016/j.ijindorg.2005.03.004

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:24644496640

VL - 23

SP - 563

EP - 586

JO - International Journal of Industrial Organization

JF - International Journal of Industrial Organization

SN - 0167-7187

IS - 7-8

ER -