Foreword

Grant Townsend, Eisaku Kanazawa, Hiroshi Takayama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This book contains papers arising from a symposium held during a combined meeting of The International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES), The Australian Anthropological Society (AAS) and The Association of Social Anthropologists of Aotearoa New Zealand at the University of Western Australia from July 5-8th, 2011. It follows on from a recently published Special Issue Supplement of Archives of Oral Biology, Volume 54, December 2009 that contains papers from an International Workshop on Oral Growth and Development held in Liverpool in 2007 and edited by Professor Alan Brook. Together, these two publications provide a comprehensive overview of state-of-the-art approaches to study dental development and variation, and open up opportunities for future collaborative research initiatives, a key aim of the International Collaborating Network in Oro-facial Genetics and Development that was founded in Liverpool in 2007. The aim of the symposium held at The University of Western Australia in 2011 was to emphasise some of the powerful new strategies offered by the science of dental anthropology to elucidate the historical lineage of human groups and also to reconstruct environmental factors that have acted on the teeth by analysing dental morphological features. In recent years, migration, as well as increases and decreases in the size of different human populations, have been evident as a result of globalisation. Dental features are also changing associated with changes in nutritional status, different economic or social circumstances, and intermarriage between peoples. Dental anthropological studies have explored these changes with the use of advanced techniques and refined methodologies. New paradigms are also evolving in the field of dental anthropology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)v-vii
JournalUnknown Journal
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 1

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Anthropology
Tooth
anthropology
intermarriage
Globalization
Environmental Factors
Western Australia
science
supplement
Biology
Migration
environmental factors
biology
New Zealand
Union
university teacher
Paradigm
globalization
Economics
migration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Townsend, G., Kanazawa, E., & Takayama, H. (2012). Foreword. Unknown Journal, v-vii. https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9780987171870.001

Foreword. / Townsend, Grant; Kanazawa, Eisaku; Takayama, Hiroshi.

In: Unknown Journal, 01.01.2012, p. v-vii.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Townsend, G, Kanazawa, E & Takayama, H 2012, 'Foreword', Unknown Journal, pp. v-vii. https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9780987171870.001
Townsend G, Kanazawa E, Takayama H. Foreword. Unknown Journal. 2012 Jan 1;v-vii. https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9780987171870.001
Townsend, Grant ; Kanazawa, Eisaku ; Takayama, Hiroshi. / Foreword. In: Unknown Journal. 2012 ; pp. v-vii.
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