Formation and growth of structure-H hydrate crystals on a water droplet in contact with methane gas and a large-molecule guest substance liquid

Ryo Ohmura, Sadatoshi Matsuda, Sinya Itoh, Takao Ebinuma, Hideo Narita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports on our visual observations of the formation and growth of structure-H hydrate crystals on a water drop partially exposed to methane gas and partially immersed in a pool of a liquid large-molecule guest substance (LMGS) for a structure-H hydrate. In each experiment, 2,2-dimethyl butane (neohexane), methylcyclohexane, or tert-butyl methyl ether was used as an LMGS with methane as a small-molecule guest substance. The temperature and pressure of the test section were set at 273.5 ± 0.2 K and 2.5 ± 0.06 MPa, respectively, to avoid possible structure-I methane hydrate formation, which may occur at a pressure above 2.7 MPa at this temperature. Hydrate crystals first formed on the water drop surface and then floated up to the apex of the drop. The hydrate crystals that were thus accumulated on the apex of the drop grew to form a cap or shell that partially covered the upper area of the drop surface. This hydrate crystal shell exhibited a coarse, apparently polycrystalline, surface texture. The polycrystalline hydrate crystals continued to grow while maintaining the form of a shell intervening between the liquid water and the methane gas. These crystals eventually covered the entire upper area of the water drop surface exposed to methane gas. This hydrate crystal growth process was commonly observed with all three of the LMGSs tested in this study. No preferential growth of the hydrate crystals on the methane-water-LMGS three-phase interfacial line, where the three substances necessary for structure-H hydrate formation are in mutual contact, was observed in any experimental run.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1821-1824
Number of pages4
JournalCrystal Growth and Design
Volume5
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Sep
Externally publishedYes

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Methane
Hydrates
hydrates
Contacts (fluid mechanics)
methane
Gases
Hydrogen
Crystals
Molecules
Water
Liquids
liquids
gases
water
crystals
molecules
apexes
visual observation
Butane
butanes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Formation and growth of structure-H hydrate crystals on a water droplet in contact with methane gas and a large-molecule guest substance liquid. / Ohmura, Ryo; Matsuda, Sadatoshi; Itoh, Sinya; Ebinuma, Takao; Narita, Hideo.

In: Crystal Growth and Design, Vol. 5, No. 5, 09.2005, p. 1821-1824.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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