Gender difference in survival of resected non-small cell lung cancer

Histology-related phenomenon?

Jee Won Chang, Hisao Asamura, Riken Kawachi, Shun ichi Watanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: It remains controversial whether there is a gender difference in survival of patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 2770 patients (1689 men and 1081 women) with non-small cell lung cancer who underwent pulmonary resection between 1995 and 2005 at the National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo. A gender difference in survival was studied in all patients, in those divided according to histology or pathologic stage, and in propensity-matched gender pairs. Results: There were no differences in background, such as preoperative pulmonary function, operation procedures, or operative mortality. The proportions of adenocarcinoma and pathologic stage I in women were greater than those in men (93.6% vs 61.7% and 71.4% vs 58.6%, respectively) (P < .001). Overall 5-year survival of women was better than that of men (81% vs 70%, P < .001). In adenocarcinoma, the overall 5-year survival for women was better than that for men in pathologic stage I (95% vs 87%, P < .001) and in pathologic stage II or higher (58% vs 51%, P = .017). In non-adenocarcinoma, there was no significant gender difference in survival in pathologic stage I (P = .313) or pathologic stage II or higher (P = .770). The variables such as age, smoking status, histology, and pathologic stage were used for propensity score matching, and survival analysis of propensity score-matched gender pairs did not show a significant difference (P = .69). Conclusion: Women had better survival than men; however, there was no survival advantage in propensity-matched gender pairs. A gender difference in survival was observed only in the adenocarcinoma subset, suggesting pathobiology in adenocarcinoma in women might be different from that of men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)807-812
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume137
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Apr
Externally publishedYes

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Histology
Survival
Adenocarcinoma
Propensity Score
Cancer Care Facilities
Lung
Tokyo
Operative Surgical Procedures
Survival Analysis
Smoking
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Gender difference in survival of resected non-small cell lung cancer : Histology-related phenomenon? / Chang, Jee Won; Asamura, Hisao; Kawachi, Riken; Watanabe, Shun ichi.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 137, No. 4, 04.2009, p. 807-812.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: It remains controversial whether there is a gender difference in survival of patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 2770 patients (1689 men and 1081 women) with non-small cell lung cancer who underwent pulmonary resection between 1995 and 2005 at the National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo. A gender difference in survival was studied in all patients, in those divided according to histology or pathologic stage, and in propensity-matched gender pairs. Results: There were no differences in background, such as preoperative pulmonary function, operation procedures, or operative mortality. The proportions of adenocarcinoma and pathologic stage I in women were greater than those in men (93.6{\%} vs 61.7{\%} and 71.4{\%} vs 58.6{\%}, respectively) (P < .001). Overall 5-year survival of women was better than that of men (81{\%} vs 70{\%}, P < .001). In adenocarcinoma, the overall 5-year survival for women was better than that for men in pathologic stage I (95{\%} vs 87{\%}, P < .001) and in pathologic stage II or higher (58{\%} vs 51{\%}, P = .017). In non-adenocarcinoma, there was no significant gender difference in survival in pathologic stage I (P = .313) or pathologic stage II or higher (P = .770). The variables such as age, smoking status, histology, and pathologic stage were used for propensity score matching, and survival analysis of propensity score-matched gender pairs did not show a significant difference (P = .69). Conclusion: Women had better survival than men; however, there was no survival advantage in propensity-matched gender pairs. A gender difference in survival was observed only in the adenocarcinoma subset, suggesting pathobiology in adenocarcinoma in women might be different from that of men.",
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