Gender-specific association of early age-related macular degeneration with systemic and genetic factors in a Japanese population

Mariko Sasaki, Sei Harada, Yumiko Kawasaki, Miki Watanabe, Hidemi Ito, Hideo Tanaka, Ayano Takeuchi, Kazuo Tsubota, Toru Takebayashi, Yuji Nishiwaki, Ryo Kawasaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Tsuruoka Metabolomics Cohort Study included subjects aged 35-74 years from participants in annual health check-up programs in Tsuruoka, Japan. The gender-specific associations of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with systemic and genetic factors was assessed cross-sectionally. Of these, 3,988 subjects had fundus photographs of sufficient quality, and early AMD was present in 12.3% and 10.3% of men and women, respectively. In men, higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lower levels of triglycerides were associated with increased odds of having early AMD after adjusting for potential risk factors (for each 1 mmol/L increase, odds ratio [OR]: 1.61 and 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-2.23 and 0.64-0.96, respectively). In women, higher levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were associated with increased risk of having early AMD (OR: 1.21 and 1.26, 95% CI: 1.01-1.44 and 1.03-1.53, respectively). Sub-analysis demonstrated that women with ARMS2 A69S polymorphisms had a stronger risk for early AMD (OR: 3.25, 95% CI: 2.10-5.04) than men (OR: 1.65, 95% CI: 1.02-2.69). Differential associations of early AMD with both systemic and genetic factors by sex were demonstrated in a Japanese cohort, which suggests that disease process of early AMD could be different by sex.

Original languageEnglish
Article number785
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Macular Degeneration
Population
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Sex Factors
Metabolomics
Hypercholesterolemia
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Japan
Triglycerides
Cohort Studies
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Gender-specific association of early age-related macular degeneration with systemic and genetic factors in a Japanese population. / Sasaki, Mariko; Harada, Sei; Kawasaki, Yumiko; Watanabe, Miki; Ito, Hidemi; Tanaka, Hideo; Takeuchi, Ayano; Tsubota, Kazuo; Takebayashi, Toru; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Kawasaki, Ryo.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 8, No. 1, 785, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sasaki, Mariko ; Harada, Sei ; Kawasaki, Yumiko ; Watanabe, Miki ; Ito, Hidemi ; Tanaka, Hideo ; Takeuchi, Ayano ; Tsubota, Kazuo ; Takebayashi, Toru ; Nishiwaki, Yuji ; Kawasaki, Ryo. / Gender-specific association of early age-related macular degeneration with systemic and genetic factors in a Japanese population. In: Scientific Reports. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
@article{ad79d81c10a94d4ca15bfdadd824aa57,
title = "Gender-specific association of early age-related macular degeneration with systemic and genetic factors in a Japanese population",
abstract = "The Tsuruoka Metabolomics Cohort Study included subjects aged 35-74 years from participants in annual health check-up programs in Tsuruoka, Japan. The gender-specific associations of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with systemic and genetic factors was assessed cross-sectionally. Of these, 3,988 subjects had fundus photographs of sufficient quality, and early AMD was present in 12.3{\%} and 10.3{\%} of men and women, respectively. In men, higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lower levels of triglycerides were associated with increased odds of having early AMD after adjusting for potential risk factors (for each 1 mmol/L increase, odds ratio [OR]: 1.61 and 0.78, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-2.23 and 0.64-0.96, respectively). In women, higher levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were associated with increased risk of having early AMD (OR: 1.21 and 1.26, 95{\%} CI: 1.01-1.44 and 1.03-1.53, respectively). Sub-analysis demonstrated that women with ARMS2 A69S polymorphisms had a stronger risk for early AMD (OR: 3.25, 95{\%} CI: 2.10-5.04) than men (OR: 1.65, 95{\%} CI: 1.02-2.69). Differential associations of early AMD with both systemic and genetic factors by sex were demonstrated in a Japanese cohort, which suggests that disease process of early AMD could be different by sex.",
author = "Mariko Sasaki and Sei Harada and Yumiko Kawasaki and Miki Watanabe and Hidemi Ito and Hideo Tanaka and Ayano Takeuchi and Kazuo Tsubota and Toru Takebayashi and Yuji Nishiwaki and Ryo Kawasaki",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41598-017-18487-4",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender-specific association of early age-related macular degeneration with systemic and genetic factors in a Japanese population

AU - Sasaki, Mariko

AU - Harada, Sei

AU - Kawasaki, Yumiko

AU - Watanabe, Miki

AU - Ito, Hidemi

AU - Tanaka, Hideo

AU - Takeuchi, Ayano

AU - Tsubota, Kazuo

AU - Takebayashi, Toru

AU - Nishiwaki, Yuji

AU - Kawasaki, Ryo

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - The Tsuruoka Metabolomics Cohort Study included subjects aged 35-74 years from participants in annual health check-up programs in Tsuruoka, Japan. The gender-specific associations of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with systemic and genetic factors was assessed cross-sectionally. Of these, 3,988 subjects had fundus photographs of sufficient quality, and early AMD was present in 12.3% and 10.3% of men and women, respectively. In men, higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lower levels of triglycerides were associated with increased odds of having early AMD after adjusting for potential risk factors (for each 1 mmol/L increase, odds ratio [OR]: 1.61 and 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-2.23 and 0.64-0.96, respectively). In women, higher levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were associated with increased risk of having early AMD (OR: 1.21 and 1.26, 95% CI: 1.01-1.44 and 1.03-1.53, respectively). Sub-analysis demonstrated that women with ARMS2 A69S polymorphisms had a stronger risk for early AMD (OR: 3.25, 95% CI: 2.10-5.04) than men (OR: 1.65, 95% CI: 1.02-2.69). Differential associations of early AMD with both systemic and genetic factors by sex were demonstrated in a Japanese cohort, which suggests that disease process of early AMD could be different by sex.

AB - The Tsuruoka Metabolomics Cohort Study included subjects aged 35-74 years from participants in annual health check-up programs in Tsuruoka, Japan. The gender-specific associations of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with systemic and genetic factors was assessed cross-sectionally. Of these, 3,988 subjects had fundus photographs of sufficient quality, and early AMD was present in 12.3% and 10.3% of men and women, respectively. In men, higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lower levels of triglycerides were associated with increased odds of having early AMD after adjusting for potential risk factors (for each 1 mmol/L increase, odds ratio [OR]: 1.61 and 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-2.23 and 0.64-0.96, respectively). In women, higher levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were associated with increased risk of having early AMD (OR: 1.21 and 1.26, 95% CI: 1.01-1.44 and 1.03-1.53, respectively). Sub-analysis demonstrated that women with ARMS2 A69S polymorphisms had a stronger risk for early AMD (OR: 3.25, 95% CI: 2.10-5.04) than men (OR: 1.65, 95% CI: 1.02-2.69). Differential associations of early AMD with both systemic and genetic factors by sex were demonstrated in a Japanese cohort, which suggests that disease process of early AMD could be different by sex.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85040786041&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85040786041&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-017-18487-4

DO - 10.1038/s41598-017-18487-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 29335418

AN - SCOPUS:85040786041

VL - 8

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

IS - 1

M1 - 785

ER -