Giant Cell Tumor of the Skull: Review of the Literature

Ryota Tamura, Tomoru Miwa, Kazuhiko Shimizu, Katsuhiro Mizutani, Hideyuki Tomita, Nobuo Yamane, Takehiro Tominaga, Shunichi Sasaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Giant cell tumors (GCTs) are rare in the skull. The present report describes a case with a primary GCT located in the temporal bone and reviews the relevant literature. We also propose a treatment strategy for GCT of the skull. Clinical Presentation A 41-year-old man presented with headache and auditory disturbance. Radiologic images showed a lytic expansive extradural lesion originating primarily from the right temporal bone and expanding into the middle cranial fossa and the infratemporal fossa. A biopsy specimen of the lesion was obtained from the external auditory meatus. Total removal was performed with temporal craniectomy, mandibular condylar process removal, tympanoplasty, and mastoidectomy. Discussion The rate of recurrence of GCTs is related to complete resection and location of the GCT rather than to the degree of invasiveness. Some of the mononuclear cells and stromal cells in GCT express receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-β ligand (RANKL). Because inhibition of RANKL and bisphosphonate therapy might eliminate giant cells, this approach might be useful for recurrent or unresectable GCTs of the skull. Conclusions Preoperative diagnosis by biopsy is important in determining the therapeutic strategy of GCTs. Complete resection is important to reduce the recurrence rate of GCTs in the skull.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Neurological Surgery, Part A: Central European Neurosurgery
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2015 Mar 10
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Giant Cell Tumors
Skull
Temporal Bone
Middle Cranial Fossa
Tympanoplasty
Biopsy
Recurrence
Diphosphonates
Giant Cells
Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Receptors
Stromal Cells
Headache
Therapeutics
Ligands

Keywords

  • bisphosphonate
  • denosumab
  • giant cell tumor
  • RANKL
  • temporal bone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Giant Cell Tumor of the Skull : Review of the Literature. / Tamura, Ryota; Miwa, Tomoru; Shimizu, Kazuhiko; Mizutani, Katsuhiro; Tomita, Hideyuki; Yamane, Nobuo; Tominaga, Takehiro; Sasaki, Shunichi.

In: Journal of Neurological Surgery, Part A: Central European Neurosurgery, 10.03.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tamura, Ryota ; Miwa, Tomoru ; Shimizu, Kazuhiko ; Mizutani, Katsuhiro ; Tomita, Hideyuki ; Yamane, Nobuo ; Tominaga, Takehiro ; Sasaki, Shunichi. / Giant Cell Tumor of the Skull : Review of the Literature. In: Journal of Neurological Surgery, Part A: Central European Neurosurgery. 2015.
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