Government as institutional entrepreneur: Extending working life in the UK and Japan

Matthew Flynn, Heike Schröder, Masa Higo, Atsuhiro Yamada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Through the lens of Institutional Entrepreneurship, this paper discusses how governments use the levers of power afforded through business and welfare systems to affect change in the organisational management of older workers. It does so using national stakeholder interviews in two contrasting economies: the United Kingdom and Japan. Both governments have taken a 'light-touch' approach to work and retirement. However, the highly institutionalised Japanese system affords the government greater leverage than that of the liberal UK system in changing employer practices at the workplace level.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-553
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Social Policy
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

working life
entrepreneur
Japan
retirement
workplace
entrepreneurship
employer
stakeholder
welfare
worker
economy
interview
management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Administration
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Government as institutional entrepreneur : Extending working life in the UK and Japan. / Flynn, Matthew; Schröder, Heike; Higo, Masa; Yamada, Atsuhiro.

In: Journal of Social Policy, Vol. 43, No. 3, 2014, p. 535-553.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Flynn, Matthew ; Schröder, Heike ; Higo, Masa ; Yamada, Atsuhiro. / Government as institutional entrepreneur : Extending working life in the UK and Japan. In: Journal of Social Policy. 2014 ; Vol. 43, No. 3. pp. 535-553.
@article{efd326f10fad4ac688ce9637293472e4,
title = "Government as institutional entrepreneur: Extending working life in the UK and Japan",
abstract = "Through the lens of Institutional Entrepreneurship, this paper discusses how governments use the levers of power afforded through business and welfare systems to affect change in the organisational management of older workers. It does so using national stakeholder interviews in two contrasting economies: the United Kingdom and Japan. Both governments have taken a 'light-touch' approach to work and retirement. However, the highly institutionalised Japanese system affords the government greater leverage than that of the liberal UK system in changing employer practices at the workplace level.",
author = "Matthew Flynn and Heike Schr{\"o}der and Masa Higo and Atsuhiro Yamada",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1017/S0047279414000075",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "535--553",
journal = "Journal of Social Policy",
issn = "0047-2794",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Government as institutional entrepreneur

T2 - Extending working life in the UK and Japan

AU - Flynn, Matthew

AU - Schröder, Heike

AU - Higo, Masa

AU - Yamada, Atsuhiro

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Through the lens of Institutional Entrepreneurship, this paper discusses how governments use the levers of power afforded through business and welfare systems to affect change in the organisational management of older workers. It does so using national stakeholder interviews in two contrasting economies: the United Kingdom and Japan. Both governments have taken a 'light-touch' approach to work and retirement. However, the highly institutionalised Japanese system affords the government greater leverage than that of the liberal UK system in changing employer practices at the workplace level.

AB - Through the lens of Institutional Entrepreneurship, this paper discusses how governments use the levers of power afforded through business and welfare systems to affect change in the organisational management of older workers. It does so using national stakeholder interviews in two contrasting economies: the United Kingdom and Japan. Both governments have taken a 'light-touch' approach to work and retirement. However, the highly institutionalised Japanese system affords the government greater leverage than that of the liberal UK system in changing employer practices at the workplace level.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84902292509&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84902292509&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0047279414000075

DO - 10.1017/S0047279414000075

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84902292509

VL - 43

SP - 535

EP - 553

JO - Journal of Social Policy

JF - Journal of Social Policy

SN - 0047-2794

IS - 3

ER -