Green tea flavonoids inhibit the LDL oxidation in osteogenic disordered rats fed a marginal ascorbic acid in diet

Seiichi Kasaoka, Kouji Hase, Tatsuya Morita, Shuhachi Kiriyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteogenic Disorder Shionogi (ODS) rats can not synthesize ascorbic acid (AA). We have examined the capacity of green tea flavonoids (GTF) to modify low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in ODS rats with dietary AA restriction. In the first experiment, ODS rats were fed diets containing 300 (AA300 diet) or 0 (AA0 diet) mg AA/kg diets for 20 d. In comparison with the AA300 diet, the AA0 diet significantly decreased the concentrations of plasma AA and α-tocopherol in LDL and significantly shortened the lag time of LDL oxidation in vitro. In the second experiment, ODS rats were fed one of the following three diets: the AA300 diet, the diet containing 25 mg AA (AA25, marginal AA)/kg diet (AA25 diet), or the diet containing 25 mg AA + 8 g GTF/kg diet (AA25 + GTF diet) for 20 d. Plasma AA concentration were significantly lower in rats fed AA25 compared with AA300 but not in those fed AA25 + GTF. LDL oxidation lag time was significantly longer in rats fed AA25 + GTF compared with the other two groups. Lag time for LDL oxidation was significantly and positively correlated with LDL α-tocopherol (r = 0.6885, P = 0.0191). These results suggest that dietary flavonoids suppress the LDL oxidation through the sparing effect on LDL α-tocopherol and/or plasma AA when AA intake is marginal in the ODS rats.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-102
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tea
Nutrition
LDL Lipoproteins
Flavonoids
Ascorbic Acid
Rats
Diet
Oxidation
Tocopherols
Plasmas
Experiments

Keywords

  • α-tocopherol
  • Ascorbic acid deficiency
  • Flavonoids
  • LDL oxidation
  • ODS rats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Green tea flavonoids inhibit the LDL oxidation in osteogenic disordered rats fed a marginal ascorbic acid in diet. / Kasaoka, Seiichi; Hase, Kouji; Morita, Tatsuya; Kiriyama, Shuhachi.

In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2002, p. 96-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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