Guidelines for primary prevention for mental health at work

Akizumi Tsutsumi, Akihito Shimazu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Occupational health experts’ and practitioners’ evaluated systematic reviews of primary prevention measures for occupational mental health. A consensus meeting was held with the intent of developing primary prevention guidelines for mental health at work. Three preventive strategies were developed- improving the psychosocial work environment, self-care training, and supervisor training. For improving the psychosocial work environment, eight recommendations and four proposed items were developed across four domains. These four domains are planning and organization development, basic rules of implementation, proposals for effective improvement measures, and continued implementation. The guidelines for self-care training consist of four steps that coincide with the process of formulating and implementing measures to help individuals cope with stress (self-care) in the workplace. These four steps are planning and preparing, deciding what self-care entails, and making subsequent efforts. Six recommendations and four proposed items are provided for these four steps. The evidence-based guidelines for supervisor mental health training include ten recommendations and four proposed items. These guidelines recommend providing training to all supervisors, with a particular focus on high-priority populations, and on the needs and situation in the workplace. The training content should be tailored to the different management levels of supervisor groups but also provide basic information, such as explaining the national guidelines and the major occupational stress models. The training should aim to change supervisors’ behaviors and not just issue warnings. The guidelines also recommend providing supervisor training periodically (annually), because there is no evidence that the training effect lasts more than 6 months. We expect these guidelines to help to promote the adoption of evidence-based preventive strategies for the management of occupational mental health.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPsychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Theory to Practice
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages61-75
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9783319444000
ISBN (Print)9783319443997
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primary Prevention
Mental Health
mental health
Guidelines
Self Care
Occupational Health
Workplace
work environment
workplace
evidence
Mental health
occupational stress
planning
Consensus
management
Organizations
Supervisors
expert
organization
Population

Keywords

  • Best available evidence
  • Evidence-based guidelines
  • Self-care training
  • Supervisor training
  • Workplace improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Tsutsumi, A., & Shimazu, A. (2016). Guidelines for primary prevention for mental health at work. In Psychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific: From Theory to Practice (pp. 61-75). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-44400-0_4

Guidelines for primary prevention for mental health at work. / Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Shimazu, Akihito.

Psychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific: From Theory to Practice. Springer International Publishing, 2016. p. 61-75.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Tsutsumi, A & Shimazu, A 2016, Guidelines for primary prevention for mental health at work. in Psychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific: From Theory to Practice. Springer International Publishing, pp. 61-75. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-44400-0_4
Tsutsumi A, Shimazu A. Guidelines for primary prevention for mental health at work. In Psychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific: From Theory to Practice. Springer International Publishing. 2016. p. 61-75 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-44400-0_4
Tsutsumi, Akizumi ; Shimazu, Akihito. / Guidelines for primary prevention for mental health at work. Psychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific: From Theory to Practice. Springer International Publishing, 2016. pp. 61-75
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