H(2) gas improves functional outcome after cardiac arrest to an extent comparable to therapeutic hypothermia in a rat model.

Kei Hayashida, Motoaki Sano, Naomi Kamimura, Takashi Yokota, Masaru Suzuki, Yuichiro Maekawa, Akio Kawamura, Takayuki Abe, Shigeo Ohta, Keiichi Fukuda, Shingo Hori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

All clinical and biological manifestations related to postcardiac arrest (CA) syndrome are attributed to ischemia-reperfusion injury in various organs including brain and heart. Molecular hydrogen (H(2)) has potential as a novel antioxidant. This study tested the hypothesis that inhalation of H(2) gas starting at the beginning of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) could improve the outcome of CA. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by transcutaneous electrical epicardial stimulation in rats. After 5 minutes of the subsequent CA, rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups at the beginning of CPR: mechanical ventilation (MV) with 2% N(2) and 98% O(2) under normothermia (37°C), the control group; MV with 2% H(2) and 98% O(2) under normothermia; MV with 2% N(2) and 98% O(2) under therapeutic hypothermia (TH), 33°C; and MV with 2% H(2) and 98% O(2) under TH. Mixed gas inhalation and TH continued until 2 hours after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). H(2) gas inhalation yielded better improvement in survival and neurological deficit score (NDS) after ROSC to an extent comparable to TH. H(2) gas inhalation, but not TH, prevented a rise in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and increase in serum IL-6 level after ROSC. The salutary impact of H(2) gas was at least partially attributed to the radical-scavenging effects of H(2) gas, because both 8-OHdG- and 4-HNE-positive cardiomyocytes were markedly suppressed by H(2) gas inhalation after ROSC. Inhalation of H(2) gas is a favorable strategy to mitigate mortality and functional outcome of post-CA syndrome in a rat model, either alone or in combination with TH.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume1
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Oct

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Induced Hypothermia
Heart Arrest
Gases
Inhalation
Artificial Respiration
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation
Ventricular Fibrillation
Reperfusion Injury
Cardiac Myocytes
Hydrogen
Interleukin-6
Antioxidants
Blood Pressure
Control Groups
Mortality
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

H(2) gas improves functional outcome after cardiac arrest to an extent comparable to therapeutic hypothermia in a rat model. / Hayashida, Kei; Sano, Motoaki; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Suzuki, Masaru; Maekawa, Yuichiro; Kawamura, Akio; Abe, Takayuki; Ohta, Shigeo; Fukuda, Keiichi; Hori, Shingo.

In: Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol. 1, No. 5, 10.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hayashida, Kei ; Sano, Motoaki ; Kamimura, Naomi ; Yokota, Takashi ; Suzuki, Masaru ; Maekawa, Yuichiro ; Kawamura, Akio ; Abe, Takayuki ; Ohta, Shigeo ; Fukuda, Keiichi ; Hori, Shingo. / H(2) gas improves functional outcome after cardiac arrest to an extent comparable to therapeutic hypothermia in a rat model. In: Journal of the American Heart Association. 2012 ; Vol. 1, No. 5.
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abstract = "All clinical and biological manifestations related to postcardiac arrest (CA) syndrome are attributed to ischemia-reperfusion injury in various organs including brain and heart. Molecular hydrogen (H(2)) has potential as a novel antioxidant. This study tested the hypothesis that inhalation of H(2) gas starting at the beginning of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) could improve the outcome of CA. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by transcutaneous electrical epicardial stimulation in rats. After 5 minutes of the subsequent CA, rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups at the beginning of CPR: mechanical ventilation (MV) with 2{\%} N(2) and 98{\%} O(2) under normothermia (37°C), the control group; MV with 2{\%} H(2) and 98{\%} O(2) under normothermia; MV with 2{\%} N(2) and 98{\%} O(2) under therapeutic hypothermia (TH), 33°C; and MV with 2{\%} H(2) and 98{\%} O(2) under TH. Mixed gas inhalation and TH continued until 2 hours after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). H(2) gas inhalation yielded better improvement in survival and neurological deficit score (NDS) after ROSC to an extent comparable to TH. H(2) gas inhalation, but not TH, prevented a rise in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and increase in serum IL-6 level after ROSC. The salutary impact of H(2) gas was at least partially attributed to the radical-scavenging effects of H(2) gas, because both 8-OHdG- and 4-HNE-positive cardiomyocytes were markedly suppressed by H(2) gas inhalation after ROSC. Inhalation of H(2) gas is a favorable strategy to mitigate mortality and functional outcome of post-CA syndrome in a rat model, either alone or in combination with TH.",
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AU - Suzuki, Masaru

AU - Maekawa, Yuichiro

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