Hemodynamic changes during neural deactivation in awake mice: A measurement by laser-Doppler flowmetry in crossed cerebellar diaschisis

Hiroyuki Takuwa, Yosuke Tajima, Daisuke Kokuryo, Tetsuya Matsuura, Hiroshi Kawaguchi, Kazuto Masamoto, Junko Taniguchi, Yoko Ikoma, Chie Seki, Ichio Aoki, Yutaka Tomita, Norihiro Suzuki, Iwao Kanno, Hiroshi Ito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) caused by contralateral supratentorial lesions can be considered a condition of neural deactivation, and hemodynamic changes in CCD were investigated with positron emission tomography (PET) in humans. In the present study, to investigate the effects of neural deactivation on hemodynamics, we developed a new mouse model of CCD, which was caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and measured changes in cerebellar blood flow (CbBF), red blood cell (RBC) velocity and concentration due to CCD using laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in awake mice. The ratio of the CCD side to the unaffected side in the cerebellum for CbBF 1 day after MCAO was decreased by -18% compared to baseline (before CCD). The ratio of the CCD side to the unaffected side for RBC concentration 1 day after MCAO was decreased by -23% compared to baseline. However, no significant changes in the ratio of the CCD side to the unaffected side were observed for RBC velocity. The present results indicate that the reduction of CbBF induced by neural deactivation was mainly caused by the decrease in RBC concentration. In contrast, our previous study showed that RBC velocity had a dominant role in the increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by neural activation. If RBC concentration can be considered an indicator of cerebral blood volume (CBV), hemodynamic changes due to neural activation and deactivation measured by LDF in mice might be in good agreement with human PET studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)350-355
Number of pages6
JournalBrain Research
Volume1537
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Nov 6

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Laser-Doppler Flowmetry
Erythrocytes
Hemodynamics
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Positron-Emission Tomography
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Cerebellum

Keywords

  • Awake animal
  • Cerebellar blood flow
  • Crossed cerebellar diaschisis
  • Neuronal deactivation
  • Red blood cell concentration
  • Red blood cell velocity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Hemodynamic changes during neural deactivation in awake mice : A measurement by laser-Doppler flowmetry in crossed cerebellar diaschisis. / Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Tajima, Yosuke; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Masamoto, Kazuto; Taniguchi, Junko; Ikoma, Yoko; Seki, Chie; Aoki, Ichio; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norihiro; Kanno, Iwao; Ito, Hiroshi.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1537, 06.11.2013, p. 350-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takuwa, H, Tajima, Y, Kokuryo, D, Matsuura, T, Kawaguchi, H, Masamoto, K, Taniguchi, J, Ikoma, Y, Seki, C, Aoki, I, Tomita, Y, Suzuki, N, Kanno, I & Ito, H 2013, 'Hemodynamic changes during neural deactivation in awake mice: A measurement by laser-Doppler flowmetry in crossed cerebellar diaschisis', Brain Research, vol. 1537, pp. 350-355. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2013.09.023
Takuwa, Hiroyuki ; Tajima, Yosuke ; Kokuryo, Daisuke ; Matsuura, Tetsuya ; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi ; Masamoto, Kazuto ; Taniguchi, Junko ; Ikoma, Yoko ; Seki, Chie ; Aoki, Ichio ; Tomita, Yutaka ; Suzuki, Norihiro ; Kanno, Iwao ; Ito, Hiroshi. / Hemodynamic changes during neural deactivation in awake mice : A measurement by laser-Doppler flowmetry in crossed cerebellar diaschisis. In: Brain Research. 2013 ; Vol. 1537. pp. 350-355.
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AU - Takuwa, Hiroyuki

AU - Tajima, Yosuke

AU - Kokuryo, Daisuke

AU - Matsuura, Tetsuya

AU - Kawaguchi, Hiroshi

AU - Masamoto, Kazuto

AU - Taniguchi, Junko

AU - Ikoma, Yoko

AU - Seki, Chie

AU - Aoki, Ichio

AU - Tomita, Yutaka

AU - Suzuki, Norihiro

AU - Kanno, Iwao

AU - Ito, Hiroshi

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N2 - Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) caused by contralateral supratentorial lesions can be considered a condition of neural deactivation, and hemodynamic changes in CCD were investigated with positron emission tomography (PET) in humans. In the present study, to investigate the effects of neural deactivation on hemodynamics, we developed a new mouse model of CCD, which was caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and measured changes in cerebellar blood flow (CbBF), red blood cell (RBC) velocity and concentration due to CCD using laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in awake mice. The ratio of the CCD side to the unaffected side in the cerebellum for CbBF 1 day after MCAO was decreased by -18% compared to baseline (before CCD). The ratio of the CCD side to the unaffected side for RBC concentration 1 day after MCAO was decreased by -23% compared to baseline. However, no significant changes in the ratio of the CCD side to the unaffected side were observed for RBC velocity. The present results indicate that the reduction of CbBF induced by neural deactivation was mainly caused by the decrease in RBC concentration. In contrast, our previous study showed that RBC velocity had a dominant role in the increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by neural activation. If RBC concentration can be considered an indicator of cerebral blood volume (CBV), hemodynamic changes due to neural activation and deactivation measured by LDF in mice might be in good agreement with human PET studies.

AB - Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) caused by contralateral supratentorial lesions can be considered a condition of neural deactivation, and hemodynamic changes in CCD were investigated with positron emission tomography (PET) in humans. In the present study, to investigate the effects of neural deactivation on hemodynamics, we developed a new mouse model of CCD, which was caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and measured changes in cerebellar blood flow (CbBF), red blood cell (RBC) velocity and concentration due to CCD using laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in awake mice. The ratio of the CCD side to the unaffected side in the cerebellum for CbBF 1 day after MCAO was decreased by -18% compared to baseline (before CCD). The ratio of the CCD side to the unaffected side for RBC concentration 1 day after MCAO was decreased by -23% compared to baseline. However, no significant changes in the ratio of the CCD side to the unaffected side were observed for RBC velocity. The present results indicate that the reduction of CbBF induced by neural deactivation was mainly caused by the decrease in RBC concentration. In contrast, our previous study showed that RBC velocity had a dominant role in the increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by neural activation. If RBC concentration can be considered an indicator of cerebral blood volume (CBV), hemodynamic changes due to neural activation and deactivation measured by LDF in mice might be in good agreement with human PET studies.

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