How quickly should communication robots respond?

Toshiyuki Shiwa, Takayuki Kanda, Michita Imai, Hiroshi Ishiguro, Norihiro Hagita

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports a study about system response time (SRT) in communication robots that utilize human-like social features, such as anthropomorphic appearance and conversation in natural language. Our research purpose established a design guideline for SRT in communication robots. The first experiment observed user preferences toward different SRTs in interaction with a robot. In other existing user interfaces, faster response is usually preferred. In contrast, our experimental result indicated that user preference for SRT in a communication robot is highest at one second, and user preference ratings level off at two seconds. However, a robot cannot always respond in such a short time as one or two seconds. Thus, the important question is "What should a robot do if it cannot respond quickly enough?" The second experiment tested the effectiveness of a conversational filler: behavior to notify listeners that the robot is going to respond. In Japanese "etto" is used to buy time to think and resembles "well..." and "uh..." In English. We used the same strategy in a communication robot to shadow system response time. Our results indicated that using a conversational filler by the robot moderated the user's impression toward a long SRT.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHRI 2008 - Proceedings of the 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction: Living with Robots
Pages153-160
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Event3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI 2008 - Amsterdam, Netherlands
Duration: 2008 Mar 122008 Mar 15

Other

Other3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI 2008
CountryNetherlands
CityAmsterdam
Period08/3/1208/3/15

Fingerprint

Robots
Communication
Fillers
User interfaces
Experiments

Keywords

  • Communication robots
  • Conversational filler
  • System response time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

Cite this

Shiwa, T., Kanda, T., Imai, M., Ishiguro, H., & Hagita, N. (2008). How quickly should communication robots respond? In HRI 2008 - Proceedings of the 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction: Living with Robots (pp. 153-160) https://doi.org/10.1145/1349822.1349843

How quickly should communication robots respond? / Shiwa, Toshiyuki; Kanda, Takayuki; Imai, Michita; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Hagita, Norihiro.

HRI 2008 - Proceedings of the 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction: Living with Robots. 2008. p. 153-160.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Shiwa, T, Kanda, T, Imai, M, Ishiguro, H & Hagita, N 2008, How quickly should communication robots respond? in HRI 2008 - Proceedings of the 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction: Living with Robots. pp. 153-160, 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI 2008, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 08/3/12. https://doi.org/10.1145/1349822.1349843
Shiwa T, Kanda T, Imai M, Ishiguro H, Hagita N. How quickly should communication robots respond? In HRI 2008 - Proceedings of the 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction: Living with Robots. 2008. p. 153-160 https://doi.org/10.1145/1349822.1349843
Shiwa, Toshiyuki ; Kanda, Takayuki ; Imai, Michita ; Ishiguro, Hiroshi ; Hagita, Norihiro. / How quickly should communication robots respond?. HRI 2008 - Proceedings of the 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction: Living with Robots. 2008. pp. 153-160
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