How significant is the assessment of the DSM-5 'anxious distress' specifier in patients with major depressive disorder without comorbid anxiety disorders in the continuation/maintenance phase?

Tempei Otsubo, Choryo Hokama, Nana Sano, Yoshinori Watanabe, Toshiaki Kikuchi, Katsutoshi Tanaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Anxious distress (ANXD), which is common in major depressive disorder (MDD), is associated with poor outcomes. We investigated clinical characteristics of MDD patients with the DSM-5 ANXD specifier and only mild residual symptoms without comorbid anxiety disorders in the continuation/maintenance phase. Methods: We recruited 110 outpatients with MDD without comorbid anxiety disorders. They were interviewed; the presence of the DSM-5 ANXD specifier was assessed. They completed the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS), the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (S-EPQ), the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego-Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A). Results: The mean QIDS total score was 9.7 ± 5.5. The DSM-5 ANXD specifier was identified in 73 patients (66.4%). A univariate analysis indicated ANXD was significantly associated with younger age; unmarried status; living alone; higher QIDS total score; higher S-EPQ neuroticism score; and higher TEMPS-A cyclothymic, depressive and irritable scores. After covariate adjustment, a multivariable linear regression analysis revealed a significant association between the QIDS total score and ANXD (three different models). Conclusion: The DSM-5 ANXD was also common among MDD patients without comorbid anxiety disorders in the continuation/maintenance phase; it was significantly associated with greater depression severity and might be related to temperament associated with bipolar disorder.Key points DSM-5 anxious distress is common among MDD patients without comorbid anxiety disorders in the continuation/maintenance phase and correlated with some of their socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. • The presence of DSM-5 anxious distress was significantly associated with greater severity of depression and might be related to temperament associated with bipolar disorder. • The evaluation of the DSM-5 anxiety distress was revealed to have some significance not only in the acute phase but also in the continuation/maintenance phase of MDD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Japanese
  • Severity
  • bipolarity
  • personality
  • temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'How significant is the assessment of the DSM-5 'anxious distress' specifier in patients with major depressive disorder without comorbid anxiety disorders in the continuation/maintenance phase?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this