Human circulating monocytes as multipotential progenitors

Noriyuki Seta, Masataka Kuwana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Circulating monocytes are believed to be committed precursors for phagocytes, such as macrophages and dendritic cells. Recently, we have reported a primitive human cell population called monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMC), which has a fibroblast-like morphology and a unique phenotype positive for CD14, CD45, CD34, and type I collagen. This novel cell type exhibits mixed morphologic and phenotypic features of monocytes, endothelial cells, and mesenchymal cells. MOMC are derived from circulating CD14+ monocytes, and their differentiation requires binding to fibronectin and exposure to one or more soluble factors derived from peripheral blood CD14- cells. MOMC contain progenitors with capacity to differentiate into a variety of non-phagocytes, including bone, cartilage, fat, skeletal and cardiac muscle, neuron, and endothelium. Recent studies by others have also described several distinct human cell populations that are originated from circulating monocytes and have capacity to differentiate into non-phagocytes. These observations together indicate that circulating monocytes are more multipotential than previously thought. In addition, cell transplantation therapies using circulating monocytes are a potential approach for tissue regeneration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-47
Number of pages7
JournalKeio Journal of Medicine
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jun

Fingerprint

Monocytes
Cell Transplantation
Phagocytes
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Collagen Type I
Fibronectins
Dendritic Cells
Population
Cartilage
Endothelium
Regeneration
Blood Cells
Myocardium
Skeletal Muscle
Stem Cells
Endothelial Cells
Fibroblasts
Fats
Macrophages
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Differentiation
  • Monocytes
  • Progenitor
  • Regeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Human circulating monocytes as multipotential progenitors. / Seta, Noriyuki; Kuwana, Masataka.

In: Keio Journal of Medicine, Vol. 56, No. 2, 06.2007, p. 41-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seta, Noriyuki ; Kuwana, Masataka. / Human circulating monocytes as multipotential progenitors. In: Keio Journal of Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 56, No. 2. pp. 41-47.
@article{6154aefe43d24696a6d8ad84be41597c,
title = "Human circulating monocytes as multipotential progenitors",
abstract = "Circulating monocytes are believed to be committed precursors for phagocytes, such as macrophages and dendritic cells. Recently, we have reported a primitive human cell population called monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMC), which has a fibroblast-like morphology and a unique phenotype positive for CD14, CD45, CD34, and type I collagen. This novel cell type exhibits mixed morphologic and phenotypic features of monocytes, endothelial cells, and mesenchymal cells. MOMC are derived from circulating CD14+ monocytes, and their differentiation requires binding to fibronectin and exposure to one or more soluble factors derived from peripheral blood CD14- cells. MOMC contain progenitors with capacity to differentiate into a variety of non-phagocytes, including bone, cartilage, fat, skeletal and cardiac muscle, neuron, and endothelium. Recent studies by others have also described several distinct human cell populations that are originated from circulating monocytes and have capacity to differentiate into non-phagocytes. These observations together indicate that circulating monocytes are more multipotential than previously thought. In addition, cell transplantation therapies using circulating monocytes are a potential approach for tissue regeneration.",
keywords = "Differentiation, Monocytes, Progenitor, Regeneration",
author = "Noriyuki Seta and Masataka Kuwana",
year = "2007",
month = "6",
doi = "10.2302/kjm.56.41",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "41--47",
journal = "Keio Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0022-9717",
publisher = "Keio University School of Medicine",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human circulating monocytes as multipotential progenitors

AU - Seta, Noriyuki

AU - Kuwana, Masataka

PY - 2007/6

Y1 - 2007/6

N2 - Circulating monocytes are believed to be committed precursors for phagocytes, such as macrophages and dendritic cells. Recently, we have reported a primitive human cell population called monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMC), which has a fibroblast-like morphology and a unique phenotype positive for CD14, CD45, CD34, and type I collagen. This novel cell type exhibits mixed morphologic and phenotypic features of monocytes, endothelial cells, and mesenchymal cells. MOMC are derived from circulating CD14+ monocytes, and their differentiation requires binding to fibronectin and exposure to one or more soluble factors derived from peripheral blood CD14- cells. MOMC contain progenitors with capacity to differentiate into a variety of non-phagocytes, including bone, cartilage, fat, skeletal and cardiac muscle, neuron, and endothelium. Recent studies by others have also described several distinct human cell populations that are originated from circulating monocytes and have capacity to differentiate into non-phagocytes. These observations together indicate that circulating monocytes are more multipotential than previously thought. In addition, cell transplantation therapies using circulating monocytes are a potential approach for tissue regeneration.

AB - Circulating monocytes are believed to be committed precursors for phagocytes, such as macrophages and dendritic cells. Recently, we have reported a primitive human cell population called monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMC), which has a fibroblast-like morphology and a unique phenotype positive for CD14, CD45, CD34, and type I collagen. This novel cell type exhibits mixed morphologic and phenotypic features of monocytes, endothelial cells, and mesenchymal cells. MOMC are derived from circulating CD14+ monocytes, and their differentiation requires binding to fibronectin and exposure to one or more soluble factors derived from peripheral blood CD14- cells. MOMC contain progenitors with capacity to differentiate into a variety of non-phagocytes, including bone, cartilage, fat, skeletal and cardiac muscle, neuron, and endothelium. Recent studies by others have also described several distinct human cell populations that are originated from circulating monocytes and have capacity to differentiate into non-phagocytes. These observations together indicate that circulating monocytes are more multipotential than previously thought. In addition, cell transplantation therapies using circulating monocytes are a potential approach for tissue regeneration.

KW - Differentiation

KW - Monocytes

KW - Progenitor

KW - Regeneration

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34447130221&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34447130221&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2302/kjm.56.41

DO - 10.2302/kjm.56.41

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 41

EP - 47

JO - Keio Journal of Medicine

JF - Keio Journal of Medicine

SN - 0022-9717

IS - 2

ER -