Hyperkalemia in Real-World Patients Under Continuous Medical Care in Japan

N. Kashihara, Shun Kosaka, Eiichiro Kanda, Suguru Okami, Toshitaka Yajima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: An abnormal serum potassium (S-K) level is an important electrolyte disturbance. However, its relation to clinical outcomes in real-world patients, particularly hyperkalemia burden, is not extensively studied. Methods: An observational retrospective cohort study using a Japanese hospital claims database was done (April 2008–September 2017; N = 1,022,087). Associations between index S-K level and 3-year survival were modeled using cubic spline regression. Cox regression model was applied to estimate the time to death according to different S-K levels. Prevalence, patient characteristics, treatment patterns, and management of patients with hyperkalemia from first episode were assessed. Results: Hyperkalemia prevalence was 67.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 67.1–68.8) per 1000 and increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) (227.9; 95% CI: 224.3–231.5), heart failure (134.0; 95% CI: 131.2–136.8), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor (RAASi) use (142.2; 95% CI: 139.6–144.7). U-shaped associations between S-K level and 3-year survival were observed with nadir 4.0 mEq/l. The risk of death was increased at S-K 5.1–5.4 mEq with hazard ratio of 7.6 (95% CI: 7.2–8.0). The 3-year mortality rate in patients with CKD stages 3a, 3b, 4, and 5 with normokalemia were 1.51%, 3.93%, 10.86%, and 12.09%, whereas that in patients with CKD stage 3a at S-K 5.1–5.4, 5.5–5.9, and ≥6.0 mEq/l increased to 10.31%, 11.43%, and 22.64%, respectively. Despite treatment with loop diuretics (18.5%) and potassium binders (5.8%), >30% of patients had persistently high S-K (≥5.1 mEq/l). Conclusion: This study provides real-world insight on hyperkalemia based on a large number of patients with various medical backgrounds.

Original languageEnglish
JournalKidney International Reports
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Hyperkalemia
Japan
Confidence Intervals
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Potassium
Sodium Potassium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors
Survival
Renin-Angiotensin System
Proportional Hazards Models
Electrolytes
Cohort Studies
Heart Failure
Retrospective Studies
Databases
Mortality
Therapeutics
Serum

Keywords

  • chronic kidney disease
  • congestive heart failure
  • hyperkalemia
  • renin angiotensin system
  • renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Hyperkalemia in Real-World Patients Under Continuous Medical Care in Japan. / Kashihara, N.; Kosaka, Shun; Kanda, Eiichiro; Okami, Suguru; Yajima, Toshitaka.

In: Kidney International Reports, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kashihara, N. ; Kosaka, Shun ; Kanda, Eiichiro ; Okami, Suguru ; Yajima, Toshitaka. / Hyperkalemia in Real-World Patients Under Continuous Medical Care in Japan. In: Kidney International Reports. 2019.
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abstract = "Introduction: An abnormal serum potassium (S-K) level is an important electrolyte disturbance. However, its relation to clinical outcomes in real-world patients, particularly hyperkalemia burden, is not extensively studied. Methods: An observational retrospective cohort study using a Japanese hospital claims database was done (April 2008–September 2017; N = 1,022,087). Associations between index S-K level and 3-year survival were modeled using cubic spline regression. Cox regression model was applied to estimate the time to death according to different S-K levels. Prevalence, patient characteristics, treatment patterns, and management of patients with hyperkalemia from first episode were assessed. Results: Hyperkalemia prevalence was 67.9 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 67.1–68.8) per 1000 and increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) (227.9; 95{\%} CI: 224.3–231.5), heart failure (134.0; 95{\%} CI: 131.2–136.8), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor (RAASi) use (142.2; 95{\%} CI: 139.6–144.7). U-shaped associations between S-K level and 3-year survival were observed with nadir 4.0 mEq/l. The risk of death was increased at S-K 5.1–5.4 mEq with hazard ratio of 7.6 (95{\%} CI: 7.2–8.0). The 3-year mortality rate in patients with CKD stages 3a, 3b, 4, and 5 with normokalemia were 1.51{\%}, 3.93{\%}, 10.86{\%}, and 12.09{\%}, whereas that in patients with CKD stage 3a at S-K 5.1–5.4, 5.5–5.9, and ≥6.0 mEq/l increased to 10.31{\%}, 11.43{\%}, and 22.64{\%}, respectively. Despite treatment with loop diuretics (18.5{\%}) and potassium binders (5.8{\%}), >30{\%} of patients had persistently high S-K (≥5.1 mEq/l). Conclusion: This study provides real-world insight on hyperkalemia based on a large number of patients with various medical backgrounds.",
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AU - Kosaka, Shun

AU - Kanda, Eiichiro

AU - Okami, Suguru

AU - Yajima, Toshitaka

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Introduction: An abnormal serum potassium (S-K) level is an important electrolyte disturbance. However, its relation to clinical outcomes in real-world patients, particularly hyperkalemia burden, is not extensively studied. Methods: An observational retrospective cohort study using a Japanese hospital claims database was done (April 2008–September 2017; N = 1,022,087). Associations between index S-K level and 3-year survival were modeled using cubic spline regression. Cox regression model was applied to estimate the time to death according to different S-K levels. Prevalence, patient characteristics, treatment patterns, and management of patients with hyperkalemia from first episode were assessed. Results: Hyperkalemia prevalence was 67.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 67.1–68.8) per 1000 and increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) (227.9; 95% CI: 224.3–231.5), heart failure (134.0; 95% CI: 131.2–136.8), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor (RAASi) use (142.2; 95% CI: 139.6–144.7). U-shaped associations between S-K level and 3-year survival were observed with nadir 4.0 mEq/l. The risk of death was increased at S-K 5.1–5.4 mEq with hazard ratio of 7.6 (95% CI: 7.2–8.0). The 3-year mortality rate in patients with CKD stages 3a, 3b, 4, and 5 with normokalemia were 1.51%, 3.93%, 10.86%, and 12.09%, whereas that in patients with CKD stage 3a at S-K 5.1–5.4, 5.5–5.9, and ≥6.0 mEq/l increased to 10.31%, 11.43%, and 22.64%, respectively. Despite treatment with loop diuretics (18.5%) and potassium binders (5.8%), >30% of patients had persistently high S-K (≥5.1 mEq/l). Conclusion: This study provides real-world insight on hyperkalemia based on a large number of patients with various medical backgrounds.

AB - Introduction: An abnormal serum potassium (S-K) level is an important electrolyte disturbance. However, its relation to clinical outcomes in real-world patients, particularly hyperkalemia burden, is not extensively studied. Methods: An observational retrospective cohort study using a Japanese hospital claims database was done (April 2008–September 2017; N = 1,022,087). Associations between index S-K level and 3-year survival were modeled using cubic spline regression. Cox regression model was applied to estimate the time to death according to different S-K levels. Prevalence, patient characteristics, treatment patterns, and management of patients with hyperkalemia from first episode were assessed. Results: Hyperkalemia prevalence was 67.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 67.1–68.8) per 1000 and increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) (227.9; 95% CI: 224.3–231.5), heart failure (134.0; 95% CI: 131.2–136.8), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor (RAASi) use (142.2; 95% CI: 139.6–144.7). U-shaped associations between S-K level and 3-year survival were observed with nadir 4.0 mEq/l. The risk of death was increased at S-K 5.1–5.4 mEq with hazard ratio of 7.6 (95% CI: 7.2–8.0). The 3-year mortality rate in patients with CKD stages 3a, 3b, 4, and 5 with normokalemia were 1.51%, 3.93%, 10.86%, and 12.09%, whereas that in patients with CKD stage 3a at S-K 5.1–5.4, 5.5–5.9, and ≥6.0 mEq/l increased to 10.31%, 11.43%, and 22.64%, respectively. Despite treatment with loop diuretics (18.5%) and potassium binders (5.8%), >30% of patients had persistently high S-K (≥5.1 mEq/l). Conclusion: This study provides real-world insight on hyperkalemia based on a large number of patients with various medical backgrounds.

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KW - congestive heart failure

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KW - renin angiotensin system

KW - renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitor

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