Hypofrontality in panic disorder and major depressive disorder assessed by multi-channel near-infrared spectroscopy.

Haruhisa Ohta, Bun Yamagata, Hiroi Tomioka, Taro Takahashi, Madoka Yano, Kazuyuki Nakagome, Masaru Mimura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Panic disorder is a common and debilitating psychiatric disease; yet, the neurobiology of this disorder is not fully understood. Deficits in the prefrontal inhibitory control over hyperactivity of the anxiety-related neural circuit are implicated in the pathophysiological core of panic disorder. The aims of this study were to investigate whether panic disorder reveals frontal lobe dysfunction while performing the word fluency test by using multi-channel near-infrared spectroscopy and to compare the findings in panic disorder with those in major depressive disorder. METHODS: Twenty-one patients with panic disorder, 17 patients with major depressive disorder, and 24 healthy control subjects participated in the study. RESULTS: Both patients with panic disorder and with major depressive disorder showed similarly attenuated increases in oxy-hemoglobin during the word fluency test in the bilateral frontal regions, when compared to healthy control participants. Hypofrontality in panic disorder and major depressive disorder was most prominent in the left medial inferior frontal lobe. CONCLUSIONS: This study clarified that hypofrontality in panic disorder is evident even with neutral stimuli of little emotional load.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1053-1059
Number of pages7
JournalDepression and Anxiety
Volume25
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Panic Disorder
Major Depressive Disorder
Frontal Lobe
Healthy Volunteers
Neurobiology
Psychiatry
Hemoglobins
Anxiety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Hypofrontality in panic disorder and major depressive disorder assessed by multi-channel near-infrared spectroscopy. / Ohta, Haruhisa; Yamagata, Bun; Tomioka, Hiroi; Takahashi, Taro; Yano, Madoka; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Mimura, Masaru.

In: Depression and Anxiety, Vol. 25, No. 12, 2008, p. 1053-1059.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ohta, Haruhisa ; Yamagata, Bun ; Tomioka, Hiroi ; Takahashi, Taro ; Yano, Madoka ; Nakagome, Kazuyuki ; Mimura, Masaru. / Hypofrontality in panic disorder and major depressive disorder assessed by multi-channel near-infrared spectroscopy. In: Depression and Anxiety. 2008 ; Vol. 25, No. 12. pp. 1053-1059.
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AU - Mimura, Masaru

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