Identification of a glioma antigen, GARC-1, using cytotoxic T lymphocytes induced by HSV cancer vaccine

Yukihiko Iizuka, Hidefumi Kojima, Tetsuji Kobata, Takeshi Kawase, Yutaka Kawakami, Masahiro Toda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite several ongoing clinical trials of immunotherapies against glioma, few glioma-specifk antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) have been identified. We recently demonstrated that intratumoral inoculation with herpes simplex virus (HSV) as a cancer vaccine activates tumor-specific CTLs. To identify glioma antigens recognized by CTLs, we used the HSV cancer vaccine to vaccinate mice harboring a syngeneic mouse glioma cell line, GL261. From the splenocytes of the immunized mice, we generated an H-2Db-restricted CTL line, GCL-1, that was specific for GL261. Then, a cDNA expression library generated from GL261 was screened with GCL-1, and a new gene encoding glioma antigen, GARC-1, was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that the GARC-1 gene isolated from GL261 had a point mutation causing an amino acid change (Asp to Asn at position 81). T-cell epitope analysis revealed that the mutated peptide GARC-177-85 (AALLNKLYA) but not the wild-type peptide (AALLDKLYA), was recognized by GCL-1. These results suggest that HSV cancer vaccination may be a useful method for inducing tumor-specific CTLs and identifying tumor antigens. Furthermore, this GL261/GARC-1 murine glioma model may be useful for the development of immunotherapy for brain tumors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)942-949
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume118
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Feb 15

Fingerprint

Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines
Cancer Vaccines
Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes
Glioma
Antigens
Simplexvirus
Immunotherapy
Neoplasms
Peptides
T-Lymphocyte Epitopes
Neoplasm Antigens
Gene Library
Point Mutation
Brain Neoplasms
Genes
Sequence Analysis
Vaccination
Clinical Trials
Amino Acids
Cell Line

Keywords

  • Antigen
  • Cancer vaccine
  • CTL
  • G207
  • GL261
  • Glioma
  • HSV
  • Immunotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Identification of a glioma antigen, GARC-1, using cytotoxic T lymphocytes induced by HSV cancer vaccine. / Iizuka, Yukihiko; Kojima, Hidefumi; Kobata, Tetsuji; Kawase, Takeshi; Kawakami, Yutaka; Toda, Masahiro.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 118, No. 4, 15.02.2006, p. 942-949.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Iizuka, Yukihiko ; Kojima, Hidefumi ; Kobata, Tetsuji ; Kawase, Takeshi ; Kawakami, Yutaka ; Toda, Masahiro. / Identification of a glioma antigen, GARC-1, using cytotoxic T lymphocytes induced by HSV cancer vaccine. In: International Journal of Cancer. 2006 ; Vol. 118, No. 4. pp. 942-949.
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