IFN-γ, produced by NK cells that infiltrate liver allografts early after transplantation, links the innate and adaptive immune responses

Hideaki Obara, Kazuhito Nagasaki, Christine L. Hsieh, Yasuhiro Ogura, Carlos O. Esquivel, Olivia M. Martinez, Sheri M. Krams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of NK cells following solid organ transplantation remains unclear. We examined NK cells in acute allograft rejection using a high responder model (DA → Lewis) of rat orthotopic liver transplantation. Recipient-derived NK cells infiltrated liver allografts early after transplantation. Since chemokines are important in the trafficking of cells to areas of inflammation, we determined the intragraft expression of chemokines known to attract NK cells. CCL3 was significantly increased in allografts at 6 h post-transplant as compared to syngeneic grafts whereas CCL2 and CXCL10 were elevated in both syngeneic and allogeneic grafts. CXCL10 and CX3CL1 were significantly upregulated in allografts by day 3 post-transplant as compared to syngeneic grafts suggesting a role for these chemokines in the recruitment of effector cells to allografts. Graft-infiltrating NK cells were shown to be a major source of IFN-γ, and IFN-γ levels in the serum were markedly increased, specifically in allograft recipients, by day 3 post-transplant. Accordingly, in the absence of NK cells the levels of IFN-γ were significantly decreased. Furthermore, graft survival was significantly prolonged. These data suggest that IFN-γ -producing NK cells are an important link between the innate and adaptive immune responses early after transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2094-2103
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume5
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Sep
Externally publishedYes

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Adaptive Immunity
Innate Immunity
Natural Killer Cells
Allografts
Transplantation
Transplants
Liver
Chemokines
Organ Transplantation
Graft Survival
Liver Transplantation
Inflammation
Serum

Keywords

  • Chemokines
  • Cytokines
  • NK cells
  • Rodent
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

IFN-γ, produced by NK cells that infiltrate liver allografts early after transplantation, links the innate and adaptive immune responses. / Obara, Hideaki; Nagasaki, Kazuhito; Hsieh, Christine L.; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Esquivel, Carlos O.; Martinez, Olivia M.; Krams, Sheri M.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 5, No. 9, 09.2005, p. 2094-2103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Obara, Hideaki ; Nagasaki, Kazuhito ; Hsieh, Christine L. ; Ogura, Yasuhiro ; Esquivel, Carlos O. ; Martinez, Olivia M. ; Krams, Sheri M. / IFN-γ, produced by NK cells that infiltrate liver allografts early after transplantation, links the innate and adaptive immune responses. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2005 ; Vol. 5, No. 9. pp. 2094-2103.
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