IGF2 preserves osteosarcoma cell survival by creating an autophagic state of dormancy that protects cells against chemotherapeutic stress

Takatsune Shimizu, Eiji Sugihara, Sayaka Yamaguchi-Iwai, Sakura Tamaki, Yuko Koyama, Walied Kamel, Arisa Ueki, Tomoki Ishikawa, Tatsuyuki Chiyoda, Satoru Osuka, Nobuyuki Onishi, Hiroko Ikeda, Junzo Kamei, Koichi Matsuo, Yumi Fukuchi, Toshihiro Nagai, Junya Toguchida, Yoshiaki Toyama, Akihiro Muto, Hideyuki Saya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteosarcoma is a malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents characterized by intrinsic therapeutic resistance. The IGF2 is expressed at elevated levels in osteosarcoma after treatment with chemotherapy, prompting an examination of its functional contributions to resistance. We found that continuous exposure to IGF2 or insulin in the absence of serum created a dormant growth state in osteosarcoma cells that conferred resistance to various chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro. Mechanistic investigations revealed that this dormant state correlated with downregulation of downstream signaling by the IGF1 receptor, heightened cell survival, enhanced autophagy, and the presence of extracellular glutamine. Notably, inhibiting autophagy or depleting glutamine was sufficient to increase chemotherapeutic sensitivity in osteosarcoma xenografts in mice. Clinically, we confirmed that IGF expression levels were elevated in human osteosarcoma specimens from patients who received chemotherapy. Together, our results suggest that activation of IGF or insulin signaling preserves the survival of osteosarcoma cells under chemotherapeutic stress, providing a drug-resistant population that may engender minimal residual disease. Attenuating this survival mechanism may help overcome therapeutic resistance in osteosarcoma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6531-6541
Number of pages11
JournalCancer Research
Volume74
Issue number22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Nov 15

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Osteosarcoma
Cell Survival
Autophagy
Glutamine
Insulin
Drug Therapy
Residual Neoplasm
Heterografts
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics
Down-Regulation
Bone and Bones
Survival
Growth
Serum
Population
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

IGF2 preserves osteosarcoma cell survival by creating an autophagic state of dormancy that protects cells against chemotherapeutic stress. / Shimizu, Takatsune; Sugihara, Eiji; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Sayaka; Tamaki, Sakura; Koyama, Yuko; Kamel, Walied; Ueki, Arisa; Ishikawa, Tomoki; Chiyoda, Tatsuyuki; Osuka, Satoru; Onishi, Nobuyuki; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kamei, Junzo; Matsuo, Koichi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Nagai, Toshihiro; Toguchida, Junya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Muto, Akihiro; Saya, Hideyuki.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 74, No. 22, 15.11.2014, p. 6531-6541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shimizu, T, Sugihara, E, Yamaguchi-Iwai, S, Tamaki, S, Koyama, Y, Kamel, W, Ueki, A, Ishikawa, T, Chiyoda, T, Osuka, S, Onishi, N, Ikeda, H, Kamei, J, Matsuo, K, Fukuchi, Y, Nagai, T, Toguchida, J, Toyama, Y, Muto, A & Saya, H 2014, 'IGF2 preserves osteosarcoma cell survival by creating an autophagic state of dormancy that protects cells against chemotherapeutic stress', Cancer Research, vol. 74, no. 22, pp. 6531-6541. https://doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-14-0914
Shimizu, Takatsune ; Sugihara, Eiji ; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Sayaka ; Tamaki, Sakura ; Koyama, Yuko ; Kamel, Walied ; Ueki, Arisa ; Ishikawa, Tomoki ; Chiyoda, Tatsuyuki ; Osuka, Satoru ; Onishi, Nobuyuki ; Ikeda, Hiroko ; Kamei, Junzo ; Matsuo, Koichi ; Fukuchi, Yumi ; Nagai, Toshihiro ; Toguchida, Junya ; Toyama, Yoshiaki ; Muto, Akihiro ; Saya, Hideyuki. / IGF2 preserves osteosarcoma cell survival by creating an autophagic state of dormancy that protects cells against chemotherapeutic stress. In: Cancer Research. 2014 ; Vol. 74, No. 22. pp. 6531-6541.
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