Immediate effects of electrical stimulation combined with passive locomotion-like movement on gait velocity and spasticity in persons with hemiparetic stroke: A randomized controlled study

Tomofumi Yamaguchi, Shigeo Tanabe, Yoshihiro Muraoka, Yoshihisa Masakado, Akio Kimura, Tetsuya Tsuji, Meigen Liu

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Research to examine the immediate effects of electrical stimulation combined with passive locomotion-like movement on gait velocity and spasticity.Design: A single-masked, randomized controlled trial design.Subjects: Twenty-seven stroke inpatients in subacute phase (ischemic n=16, hemorrhagic n=11).Interventions: A novel approach using electrical stimulation combined with passive locomotion-like movement.Main measures: We assessed the maximum gait speed and modified Ashworth scale before and 20 minutes after the interventions.Results: The gait velocity of the electrical stimulation combined with passive locomotion-like movement group showed the increase form 0.68±0.28 (mean±SD, unit: m) to 0.76±0.32 after the intervention. Both the electrical stimulation group and passive locomotion-like movement group also showed increases after the interventions (from 0.76±0.37 to 0.79±0.40, from 0.74±0.35 to 0.77±0.36, respectively). The gait velocity of the electrical stimulation combined with passive locomotion-like movement group differed significantly from those of the other groups (electrical stimulation combined with passive locomotion-like movement versus electrical stimulation: P=0.049, electrical stimulation combined with passive locomotion-like movement versus passive locomotion-like movement: P=0.025). Although there was no statistically significant difference in the modified Ashworth scale among the three groups, six of the nine subjects (66.6%) in the electrical stimulation combined with passive locomotion-like movement group showed improvement in the modified Ashworth scale score, while only three of the nine subjects (33.3%) in the electrical stimulation group and two of the nine subjects (22.2%) improved in the passive locomotion-like movement group.Conclusion: These findings suggest electrical stimulation combined with passive locomotion-like movement could improve gait velocity in stroke patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)619-628
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Rehabilitation
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jul 1

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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