Impact of prescription-term deregulation with revised medical service fees on drug therapy management

Hitoshi Kawazoe, Naomi Iihara, Chiaki Doi, Shushi Morita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The proclamation of April 2002 of a Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare ordinance has enabled doctors to prescribe drugs for an outpatient without a limit on the length of prescription terms except for a few drugs. There is a concern that the prescription-term deregulation could cause careless drug therapy management in order to extend the interval between patient hospital visits. The purpose of this study is to make pre- and post-deregulation comparisons of two items, prescription terms and implementation of clinical examination that complied with package-insert precautions, and to discuss the approaches to increase safety. Prescription terms have lengthened progressively. In the pre-regulation period of January to March 2002, the mean prescription term was 19.9 days; in the post-regulation period of July to September 2002, it was 24.9 days; and in July to September 2003, 28.6 days. Even for anti-tumor agents, there were prescriptions over 90 days after deregulation. There was no significant difference between the pre- and post-deregulation compliance ratios for the package-insert precautions in eight drugs of investigated nine. However, one case had a delay in detection of liver dysfunction, which was caused by deviation from the once-a-month testing indicated in the package-insert precautions for prolonged prescription terms. The evidence suggested that the deregulation led to negligent drug therapy management. To assure safe therapy, the following should be addressed: first, sufficient function of a computerized prescriber order entry system and second, creation of a new framework with pharmacists' active involvement such as collaborative therapy management with physicians.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)959-969
Number of pages11
JournalYakugaku Zasshi
Volume125
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medication Therapy Management
Fee-for-Service Plans
Prescriptions
Product Labeling
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacists
Compliance
Liver Diseases
Outpatients
Physicians
Safety
Health
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Clinical examination
  • Drug safety
  • Drug therapy management
  • Outpatients
  • Pharmacoepidemiology
  • Prescription terms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Impact of prescription-term deregulation with revised medical service fees on drug therapy management. / Kawazoe, Hitoshi; Iihara, Naomi; Doi, Chiaki; Morita, Shushi.

In: Yakugaku Zasshi, Vol. 125, No. 12, 01.01.2005, p. 959-969.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kawazoe, Hitoshi ; Iihara, Naomi ; Doi, Chiaki ; Morita, Shushi. / Impact of prescription-term deregulation with revised medical service fees on drug therapy management. In: Yakugaku Zasshi. 2005 ; Vol. 125, No. 12. pp. 959-969.
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