Impact of respiratory synctial virus infection as a cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children younger than 3 years of age in Japan

M. Kaneko, J. Watanabe, M. Kuwahara, E. Ueno, Mariko Hida, A. Kinoshita, T. Sone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important viral pathogen for lower respiratory tract infection (LRI) in infants and children. An RSV-specific monoclonal antibody has been developed to provide prophylaxis against RSV associated LRI (RSV-LRI). The objective of this study was to determine the impact of RSV as a cause of LRI in children younger than 3 years of age to provide data to aide in the implementation of forthcoming prophylaxis against RSV. Methods: We analyzed the viral etiology of LRI in hospitalized Japanese children younger than 3 years of age admitted to Shizuoka Red Cross Hospital from July, 1997 to June, 2000. Results: A total of 535 patients younger than 3 years of age were hospitalized with LRI at Shizuoka Red Cross Hospital from July 1, 1997 to June 30, 2000. Of these, a positive diagnosis of RSV infection was made in 168 patients (31.4%). Most of the patients with RSV infection had been well and had had no underlying disease that was defined as risk factor of RSV infection (94.0%). The peak incidence of LRI was observed in the winter each year and the number of LRI was strongly associated with the epidemic of RSV (r=0.700, P<0.0001). The number of patients with LRI younger than 6 months of age was 116 (21.7%). Of these 116 patients younger than 6 months with LRI, 55 patients (47.4%) were confirmed to have RSV infection. The proportions of RSV infection to total LRI was greatest in early infants younger than 6 months (P < 0.0001). The number of patients with which RSV infection was detected in LRI patients younger than 3 years was highest during the first five months of life and there was a dramatic decrease in incidence of RSV infection with increasing age thereafter. Conclusions: The incidence of LRI hospitalization is highly affected by RSV infection epidemic. The proportion of RSV infections among early infants younger than 6 months is greater than that of older patients. The prophylaxis against RSV will be needed to be toward early infants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)240-243
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infection
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Jan 1

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Virus Diseases
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections
Respiratory Tract Infections
Japan
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Red Cross
Incidence
Hospitalized Child
Hospitalization
Monoclonal Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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Impact of respiratory synctial virus infection as a cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children younger than 3 years of age in Japan. / Kaneko, M.; Watanabe, J.; Kuwahara, M.; Ueno, E.; Hida, Mariko; Kinoshita, A.; Sone, T.

In: Journal of Infection, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.01.2002, p. 240-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaneko, M. ; Watanabe, J. ; Kuwahara, M. ; Ueno, E. ; Hida, Mariko ; Kinoshita, A. ; Sone, T. / Impact of respiratory synctial virus infection as a cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children younger than 3 years of age in Japan. In: Journal of Infection. 2002 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 240-243.
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abstract = "Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important viral pathogen for lower respiratory tract infection (LRI) in infants and children. An RSV-specific monoclonal antibody has been developed to provide prophylaxis against RSV associated LRI (RSV-LRI). The objective of this study was to determine the impact of RSV as a cause of LRI in children younger than 3 years of age to provide data to aide in the implementation of forthcoming prophylaxis against RSV. Methods: We analyzed the viral etiology of LRI in hospitalized Japanese children younger than 3 years of age admitted to Shizuoka Red Cross Hospital from July, 1997 to June, 2000. Results: A total of 535 patients younger than 3 years of age were hospitalized with LRI at Shizuoka Red Cross Hospital from July 1, 1997 to June 30, 2000. Of these, a positive diagnosis of RSV infection was made in 168 patients (31.4{\%}). Most of the patients with RSV infection had been well and had had no underlying disease that was defined as risk factor of RSV infection (94.0{\%}). The peak incidence of LRI was observed in the winter each year and the number of LRI was strongly associated with the epidemic of RSV (r=0.700, P<0.0001). The number of patients with LRI younger than 6 months of age was 116 (21.7{\%}). Of these 116 patients younger than 6 months with LRI, 55 patients (47.4{\%}) were confirmed to have RSV infection. The proportions of RSV infection to total LRI was greatest in early infants younger than 6 months (P < 0.0001). The number of patients with which RSV infection was detected in LRI patients younger than 3 years was highest during the first five months of life and there was a dramatic decrease in incidence of RSV infection with increasing age thereafter. Conclusions: The incidence of LRI hospitalization is highly affected by RSV infection epidemic. The proportion of RSV infections among early infants younger than 6 months is greater than that of older patients. The prophylaxis against RSV will be needed to be toward early infants.",
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AU - Kaneko, M.

AU - Watanabe, J.

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AU - Kinoshita, A.

AU - Sone, T.

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