Impact of speed-eating habit on subsequent body mass index and blood pressure among schoolchildren: The ibaraki children’s cohort study (IBACHIL)

Kazumasa Yamagishi, Toshimi Sairenchi, Nobuyuki Sawada, Keiko Sunou, Mizuki Sata, Utako Murai, Nobue Takizawa, Fujiko Irie, Hiroshi Watanabe, Hiroyasu Iso, Hitoshi Ota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Habitual speed eating is a risk factor of obesity but evidence of this in children is limited. We examined the association between speed-eating habit and subsequent body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure (BP) among Japanese children. Methods and Results: The community-based study comprised 1,490 Japanese boys and girls who were born in 1989, involved in the Ibaraki Children’s Cohort Study at age 3 years, and had returned questionnaires at both ages 6 and 12 years. In a subsample, we measured BP (n=263). Speed-eating habit was categorized into 4 groups: Never, Quit, Newly, and Continuous. Sex-specific mean values of questionnaire-based BMI and measured BPs at age 12 were examined according to speed-eating habit. Children with continuous speed eating had a higher BMI at age 12 than those who had never had a speed-eating habit (20.0 vs. 17.9 kg/m2 for boys (P<0.001); 20.0 vs. 18.4 kg/m2 (P<0.001) for girls). Systolic BP at age 12 was higher in boys with continuous speed eating than in those without (117 vs. 110 mmHg, P=0.01), but such a difference was not observed in girls (112 vs. 111 mmHg, P=0.95). Conclusions: Habitual speed eating was positively associated with subsequent BMI among boys and girls as well as with systolic BP among boys.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-422
Number of pages4
JournalCirculation Journal
Volume82
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

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Feeding Behavior
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Blood Pressure
Eating
Obesity

Keywords

  • Eating habits
  • Epidemiology
  • Hypertension
  • Obesity
  • Prospective studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Impact of speed-eating habit on subsequent body mass index and blood pressure among schoolchildren : The ibaraki children’s cohort study (IBACHIL). / Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Sairenchi, Toshimi; Sawada, Nobuyuki; Sunou, Keiko; Sata, Mizuki; Murai, Utako; Takizawa, Nobue; Irie, Fujiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Ota, Hitoshi.

In: Circulation Journal, Vol. 82, No. 2, 01.01.2018, p. 419-422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamagishi, K, Sairenchi, T, Sawada, N, Sunou, K, Sata, M, Murai, U, Takizawa, N, Irie, F, Watanabe, H, Iso, H & Ota, H 2018, 'Impact of speed-eating habit on subsequent body mass index and blood pressure among schoolchildren: The ibaraki children’s cohort study (IBACHIL)', Circulation Journal, vol. 82, no. 2, pp. 419-422. https://doi.org/10.1253/circj.CJ-17-0287
Yamagishi, Kazumasa ; Sairenchi, Toshimi ; Sawada, Nobuyuki ; Sunou, Keiko ; Sata, Mizuki ; Murai, Utako ; Takizawa, Nobue ; Irie, Fujiko ; Watanabe, Hiroshi ; Iso, Hiroyasu ; Ota, Hitoshi. / Impact of speed-eating habit on subsequent body mass index and blood pressure among schoolchildren : The ibaraki children’s cohort study (IBACHIL). In: Circulation Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 82, No. 2. pp. 419-422.
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AU - Sairenchi, Toshimi

AU - Sawada, Nobuyuki

AU - Sunou, Keiko

AU - Sata, Mizuki

AU - Murai, Utako

AU - Takizawa, Nobue

AU - Irie, Fujiko

AU - Watanabe, Hiroshi

AU - Iso, Hiroyasu

AU - Ota, Hitoshi

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AB - Background: Habitual speed eating is a risk factor of obesity but evidence of this in children is limited. We examined the association between speed-eating habit and subsequent body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure (BP) among Japanese children. Methods and Results: The community-based study comprised 1,490 Japanese boys and girls who were born in 1989, involved in the Ibaraki Children’s Cohort Study at age 3 years, and had returned questionnaires at both ages 6 and 12 years. In a subsample, we measured BP (n=263). Speed-eating habit was categorized into 4 groups: Never, Quit, Newly, and Continuous. Sex-specific mean values of questionnaire-based BMI and measured BPs at age 12 were examined according to speed-eating habit. Children with continuous speed eating had a higher BMI at age 12 than those who had never had a speed-eating habit (20.0 vs. 17.9 kg/m2 for boys (P<0.001); 20.0 vs. 18.4 kg/m2 (P<0.001) for girls). Systolic BP at age 12 was higher in boys with continuous speed eating than in those without (117 vs. 110 mmHg, P=0.01), but such a difference was not observed in girls (112 vs. 111 mmHg, P=0.95). Conclusions: Habitual speed eating was positively associated with subsequent BMI among boys and girls as well as with systolic BP among boys.

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KW - Hypertension

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