Improvement of corneal fluorescein staining in post cataract surgery of diabetic patients by an oral aldose reductase inhibitor, ONO-2235

Hiroshi Fujishima, Kazuo Tsubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: While the mechanism in the pathogenesis of diabetic corneal disease is unclear, aldose reductase has been implicated in corneal disease. The effects of an oral aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) on the ocular surface of diabetic patients after cataract surgery were studied. Methods: This clinical trial was designed to be randomised, double blinded, and placebo controlled. Pseudophakic patients with diabetes were randomly assigned to treatment with either oral ARI (ONO-2235) (n=12) or placebo (n=9) for 12 weeks. The vital staining of the ocular surface, tear production and clearance, break up time in tears (BUT), corneal and conjunctival sensation, and symptom score before treatments were examined as well as 4, 8, 12 weeks after the administration. Specular microscopic evaluation was also performed. Results: After a 12 week period of oral ARI administration, fluorescein staining scores (from 2.04 (SD 1.12) to 1.46 (1.18); p=0.016), conjunctival sensation (from 1.15 (0.37) to 1.36 (0.31); p=0.0006), and symptom scores (from 5.38 (1.932) to 4.00 (2.07); p=0.0002) recovered significantly. Fluorescein staining of oral ARI administration also decreased compared with placebo (p=0.017). Rose bengal staining, tear clearance, and corneal sensation were improved although this increase was minor. Tear production, BUT, and specular microscopic evaluation of the corneal epithelium and endothelium did not demonstrate a significant change. Conclusion: Oral ARI opposes the ocular surface changes caused by diabetes, by recovery of ocular surface sensitivity as demonstrated through an improvement in vital staining.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)860-863
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume86
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Aldehyde Reductase
Fluorescein
Cataract
Tears
Staining and Labeling
Corneal Diseases
Placebos
Rose Bengal
Corneal Endothelium
Corneal Epithelium
epalrestat
Clinical Trials
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

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title = "Improvement of corneal fluorescein staining in post cataract surgery of diabetic patients by an oral aldose reductase inhibitor, ONO-2235",
abstract = "Aim: While the mechanism in the pathogenesis of diabetic corneal disease is unclear, aldose reductase has been implicated in corneal disease. The effects of an oral aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) on the ocular surface of diabetic patients after cataract surgery were studied. Methods: This clinical trial was designed to be randomised, double blinded, and placebo controlled. Pseudophakic patients with diabetes were randomly assigned to treatment with either oral ARI (ONO-2235) (n=12) or placebo (n=9) for 12 weeks. The vital staining of the ocular surface, tear production and clearance, break up time in tears (BUT), corneal and conjunctival sensation, and symptom score before treatments were examined as well as 4, 8, 12 weeks after the administration. Specular microscopic evaluation was also performed. Results: After a 12 week period of oral ARI administration, fluorescein staining scores (from 2.04 (SD 1.12) to 1.46 (1.18); p=0.016), conjunctival sensation (from 1.15 (0.37) to 1.36 (0.31); p=0.0006), and symptom scores (from 5.38 (1.932) to 4.00 (2.07); p=0.0002) recovered significantly. Fluorescein staining of oral ARI administration also decreased compared with placebo (p=0.017). Rose bengal staining, tear clearance, and corneal sensation were improved although this increase was minor. Tear production, BUT, and specular microscopic evaluation of the corneal epithelium and endothelium did not demonstrate a significant change. Conclusion: Oral ARI opposes the ocular surface changes caused by diabetes, by recovery of ocular surface sensitivity as demonstrated through an improvement in vital staining.",
author = "Hiroshi Fujishima and Kazuo Tsubota",
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T1 - Improvement of corneal fluorescein staining in post cataract surgery of diabetic patients by an oral aldose reductase inhibitor, ONO-2235

AU - Fujishima, Hiroshi

AU - Tsubota, Kazuo

PY - 2002

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N2 - Aim: While the mechanism in the pathogenesis of diabetic corneal disease is unclear, aldose reductase has been implicated in corneal disease. The effects of an oral aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) on the ocular surface of diabetic patients after cataract surgery were studied. Methods: This clinical trial was designed to be randomised, double blinded, and placebo controlled. Pseudophakic patients with diabetes were randomly assigned to treatment with either oral ARI (ONO-2235) (n=12) or placebo (n=9) for 12 weeks. The vital staining of the ocular surface, tear production and clearance, break up time in tears (BUT), corneal and conjunctival sensation, and symptom score before treatments were examined as well as 4, 8, 12 weeks after the administration. Specular microscopic evaluation was also performed. Results: After a 12 week period of oral ARI administration, fluorescein staining scores (from 2.04 (SD 1.12) to 1.46 (1.18); p=0.016), conjunctival sensation (from 1.15 (0.37) to 1.36 (0.31); p=0.0006), and symptom scores (from 5.38 (1.932) to 4.00 (2.07); p=0.0002) recovered significantly. Fluorescein staining of oral ARI administration also decreased compared with placebo (p=0.017). Rose bengal staining, tear clearance, and corneal sensation were improved although this increase was minor. Tear production, BUT, and specular microscopic evaluation of the corneal epithelium and endothelium did not demonstrate a significant change. Conclusion: Oral ARI opposes the ocular surface changes caused by diabetes, by recovery of ocular surface sensitivity as demonstrated through an improvement in vital staining.

AB - Aim: While the mechanism in the pathogenesis of diabetic corneal disease is unclear, aldose reductase has been implicated in corneal disease. The effects of an oral aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) on the ocular surface of diabetic patients after cataract surgery were studied. Methods: This clinical trial was designed to be randomised, double blinded, and placebo controlled. Pseudophakic patients with diabetes were randomly assigned to treatment with either oral ARI (ONO-2235) (n=12) or placebo (n=9) for 12 weeks. The vital staining of the ocular surface, tear production and clearance, break up time in tears (BUT), corneal and conjunctival sensation, and symptom score before treatments were examined as well as 4, 8, 12 weeks after the administration. Specular microscopic evaluation was also performed. Results: After a 12 week period of oral ARI administration, fluorescein staining scores (from 2.04 (SD 1.12) to 1.46 (1.18); p=0.016), conjunctival sensation (from 1.15 (0.37) to 1.36 (0.31); p=0.0006), and symptom scores (from 5.38 (1.932) to 4.00 (2.07); p=0.0002) recovered significantly. Fluorescein staining of oral ARI administration also decreased compared with placebo (p=0.017). Rose bengal staining, tear clearance, and corneal sensation were improved although this increase was minor. Tear production, BUT, and specular microscopic evaluation of the corneal epithelium and endothelium did not demonstrate a significant change. Conclusion: Oral ARI opposes the ocular surface changes caused by diabetes, by recovery of ocular surface sensitivity as demonstrated through an improvement in vital staining.

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