Inactivated influenza vaccine effectiveness and an analysis of repeated vaccination for children during the 2016/17 season

on behalf of the Keio Pediatric Influenza Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We assessed the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in children 6 months to 15 years of age during the 2016/17 season. In addition, we estimated the impact of repeated vaccination in children on VE. Methods: Our study for VEs in preventing influenza and admission due to influenza were conducted according to a test-negative case-control design (TNCC) based on influenza rapid diagnostic test results. We also analyzed the VE by vaccine status in the current and previous seasons for the impact of repeated vaccination. Results: During the 2016/17 season, the quadrivalent IIV was used in Japan. The adjusted VE in preventing influenza illness was 38% (95% CI, 29–46) against influenza A and 39% (95% CI, 18–54) against influenza B. Infants showed no significant VE. The VE in preventing hospitalization was not demonstrated. For the analysis of repeated vaccination, the vaccine was effective only when immunization occurred in the current season. The children who were immunized in two consecutive seasons were more likely to develop influenza compared to those immunized in the current season only (odds ratio, 1.58 [95% CI, 1.05–2.38], adjusted odds ratio, 1.53 [95% CI, 0.99–2.35]). However, the odds ratio of repeated vaccination was not significant when the analysis excluded those who developed influenza in the previous season. Conclusions: VE in children in the 2016/17 season was similar to values previously reported. Repeated vaccination interfered with the VE against any influenza infection in the 2016/17 season. The results of our study suggest that decreased VE by repeat vaccination phenomenon was associated with immunity by influenza infection in the previous season. However, the influenza vaccine should be recommended every season for children.

Original languageEnglish
JournalVaccine
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Inactivated Vaccines
Influenza Vaccines
influenza
Human Influenza
Vaccination
Vaccines
vaccination
vaccines
Odds Ratio
odds ratio
Infection
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Immunity
Immunization
Japan
Hospitalization
infection
diagnostic techniques

Keywords

  • Children
  • Effectiveness
  • Hospitalization
  • Influenza vaccine
  • Repeated vaccination
  • Test-negative case control design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Inactivated influenza vaccine effectiveness and an analysis of repeated vaccination for children during the 2016/17 season. / on behalf of the Keio Pediatric Influenza Research Group.

In: Vaccine, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6c11eeef5f704a6aae4fc7b197e8f2bb,
title = "Inactivated influenza vaccine effectiveness and an analysis of repeated vaccination for children during the 2016/17 season",
abstract = "Objectives: We assessed the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in children 6 months to 15 years of age during the 2016/17 season. In addition, we estimated the impact of repeated vaccination in children on VE. Methods: Our study for VEs in preventing influenza and admission due to influenza were conducted according to a test-negative case-control design (TNCC) based on influenza rapid diagnostic test results. We also analyzed the VE by vaccine status in the current and previous seasons for the impact of repeated vaccination. Results: During the 2016/17 season, the quadrivalent IIV was used in Japan. The adjusted VE in preventing influenza illness was 38{\%} (95{\%} CI, 29–46) against influenza A and 39{\%} (95{\%} CI, 18–54) against influenza B. Infants showed no significant VE. The VE in preventing hospitalization was not demonstrated. For the analysis of repeated vaccination, the vaccine was effective only when immunization occurred in the current season. The children who were immunized in two consecutive seasons were more likely to develop influenza compared to those immunized in the current season only (odds ratio, 1.58 [95{\%} CI, 1.05–2.38], adjusted odds ratio, 1.53 [95{\%} CI, 0.99–2.35]). However, the odds ratio of repeated vaccination was not significant when the analysis excluded those who developed influenza in the previous season. Conclusions: VE in children in the 2016/17 season was similar to values previously reported. Repeated vaccination interfered with the VE against any influenza infection in the 2016/17 season. The results of our study suggest that decreased VE by repeat vaccination phenomenon was associated with immunity by influenza infection in the previous season. However, the influenza vaccine should be recommended every season for children.",
keywords = "Children, Effectiveness, Hospitalization, Influenza vaccine, Repeated vaccination, Test-negative case control design",
author = "{on behalf of the Keio Pediatric Influenza Research Group} and Masayoshi Shinjoh and Norio Sugaya and Yoshio Yamaguchi and Noriko Iibuchi and Isamu Kamimaki and Anna Goto and Hisato Kobayashi and Yasuaki Kobayashi and Meiwa Shibata and Satoshi Tamaoka and Yuji Nakata and Atsushi Narabayashi and Mitsuhiro Nishida and Yasuhiro Hirano and Takeshi Munenaga and Kumiko Morita and Keiko Mitamura and Takao Takahashi",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.07.065",
language = "English",
journal = "Vaccine",
issn = "0264-410X",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

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T1 - Inactivated influenza vaccine effectiveness and an analysis of repeated vaccination for children during the 2016/17 season

AU - on behalf of the Keio Pediatric Influenza Research Group

AU - Shinjoh, Masayoshi

AU - Sugaya, Norio

AU - Yamaguchi, Yoshio

AU - Iibuchi, Noriko

AU - Kamimaki, Isamu

AU - Goto, Anna

AU - Kobayashi, Hisato

AU - Kobayashi, Yasuaki

AU - Shibata, Meiwa

AU - Tamaoka, Satoshi

AU - Nakata, Yuji

AU - Narabayashi, Atsushi

AU - Nishida, Mitsuhiro

AU - Hirano, Yasuhiro

AU - Munenaga, Takeshi

AU - Morita, Kumiko

AU - Mitamura, Keiko

AU - Takahashi, Takao

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Objectives: We assessed the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in children 6 months to 15 years of age during the 2016/17 season. In addition, we estimated the impact of repeated vaccination in children on VE. Methods: Our study for VEs in preventing influenza and admission due to influenza were conducted according to a test-negative case-control design (TNCC) based on influenza rapid diagnostic test results. We also analyzed the VE by vaccine status in the current and previous seasons for the impact of repeated vaccination. Results: During the 2016/17 season, the quadrivalent IIV was used in Japan. The adjusted VE in preventing influenza illness was 38% (95% CI, 29–46) against influenza A and 39% (95% CI, 18–54) against influenza B. Infants showed no significant VE. The VE in preventing hospitalization was not demonstrated. For the analysis of repeated vaccination, the vaccine was effective only when immunization occurred in the current season. The children who were immunized in two consecutive seasons were more likely to develop influenza compared to those immunized in the current season only (odds ratio, 1.58 [95% CI, 1.05–2.38], adjusted odds ratio, 1.53 [95% CI, 0.99–2.35]). However, the odds ratio of repeated vaccination was not significant when the analysis excluded those who developed influenza in the previous season. Conclusions: VE in children in the 2016/17 season was similar to values previously reported. Repeated vaccination interfered with the VE against any influenza infection in the 2016/17 season. The results of our study suggest that decreased VE by repeat vaccination phenomenon was associated with immunity by influenza infection in the previous season. However, the influenza vaccine should be recommended every season for children.

AB - Objectives: We assessed the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in children 6 months to 15 years of age during the 2016/17 season. In addition, we estimated the impact of repeated vaccination in children on VE. Methods: Our study for VEs in preventing influenza and admission due to influenza were conducted according to a test-negative case-control design (TNCC) based on influenza rapid diagnostic test results. We also analyzed the VE by vaccine status in the current and previous seasons for the impact of repeated vaccination. Results: During the 2016/17 season, the quadrivalent IIV was used in Japan. The adjusted VE in preventing influenza illness was 38% (95% CI, 29–46) against influenza A and 39% (95% CI, 18–54) against influenza B. Infants showed no significant VE. The VE in preventing hospitalization was not demonstrated. For the analysis of repeated vaccination, the vaccine was effective only when immunization occurred in the current season. The children who were immunized in two consecutive seasons were more likely to develop influenza compared to those immunized in the current season only (odds ratio, 1.58 [95% CI, 1.05–2.38], adjusted odds ratio, 1.53 [95% CI, 0.99–2.35]). However, the odds ratio of repeated vaccination was not significant when the analysis excluded those who developed influenza in the previous season. Conclusions: VE in children in the 2016/17 season was similar to values previously reported. Repeated vaccination interfered with the VE against any influenza infection in the 2016/17 season. The results of our study suggest that decreased VE by repeat vaccination phenomenon was associated with immunity by influenza infection in the previous season. However, the influenza vaccine should be recommended every season for children.

KW - Children

KW - Effectiveness

KW - Hospitalization

KW - Influenza vaccine

KW - Repeated vaccination

KW - Test-negative case control design

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