Incidence of transfusion-related adverse reactions per patient reflects the potential risk of transfusion therapy in Japan

Hidefumi Kato, Motoaki Uruma, Yoshiki Okuyama, Hiroshi Fujita, Makoto Handa, Yoshiaki Tomiyama, Shigetaka Shimodaira, Yoshiyuki Kurata, Shigeru Takamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To describe the frequency of adverse reactions (ARs) after transfusion on both per transfused patient and per transfused unit bases. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of data available from records of 6 hospitals on the total number of transfusions and documented ARs between January 2008 and December 2009 for RBCs, fresh-frozen plasma (FFP), and platelet concentrates (PCs). Results: The incidence of ARs to RBCs, FFP, and PCs per transfused unit was 0.6%, 1.3%, and 3.8%, respectively. The incidence of ARs to RBCs, FFP, and PCs per patient was 2.6%, 4.3%, and 13.2%, respectively-almost 3-fold higher. Most RBC-ARs were febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions and allergic reactions, whereas most FFP-ARs and PC-ARs were allergic reactions. Conclusions: The incidence of ARs per transfused patient may reflect better the potential risk of transfusion with blood components, taking into account the characteristics of the transfused patient.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-224
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume140
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Aug

Fingerprint

Japan
Blood Platelets
Incidence
Hypersensitivity
Blood Component Transfusion
Hospital Records
Therapeutics
Fever
Transfusion Reaction

Keywords

  • Adverse reactions
  • Hemovigilance
  • Per transfused patient basis
  • Transfusion practices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Incidence of transfusion-related adverse reactions per patient reflects the potential risk of transfusion therapy in Japan. / Kato, Hidefumi; Uruma, Motoaki; Okuyama, Yoshiki; Fujita, Hiroshi; Handa, Makoto; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Kurata, Yoshiyuki; Takamoto, Shigeru.

In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 140, No. 2, 08.2013, p. 219-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kato, H, Uruma, M, Okuyama, Y, Fujita, H, Handa, M, Tomiyama, Y, Shimodaira, S, Kurata, Y & Takamoto, S 2013, 'Incidence of transfusion-related adverse reactions per patient reflects the potential risk of transfusion therapy in Japan', American Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 140, no. 2, pp. 219-224. https://doi.org/10.1309/AJCP6SBPOX0UWHEK
Kato, Hidefumi ; Uruma, Motoaki ; Okuyama, Yoshiki ; Fujita, Hiroshi ; Handa, Makoto ; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki ; Shimodaira, Shigetaka ; Kurata, Yoshiyuki ; Takamoto, Shigeru. / Incidence of transfusion-related adverse reactions per patient reflects the potential risk of transfusion therapy in Japan. In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology. 2013 ; Vol. 140, No. 2. pp. 219-224.
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