Incidents within community pharmacies across Japan: An analysis of the newly launched incident collecting project among community pharmacies and a comparison of causes between hospital pharmacies and community pharmacies

Hisako Iijima, Aya Ishizuka, Shoichi Maeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In April 2009, Japan Council for Quality Health Care (JCQHC) launched the Project to Collect Incidents within Community Pharmacies, a national project of self-and-voluntary reporting of incidents among community pharmacies. While there have been several studies and projects to collect and analyze incident reports among a set number of community pharmacies across the globe, it is still rare for an incident collecting project to exist at a national level. This paper introduces the new project in Japan. A retrospective analysis of community pharmacy participation across the country and cause of reported incidents based on the data released by JCQHC. Among the total number of reported incidents (1,460 cases), the most frequently reported incidents were related to the task of filling out prescriptions (92.0%). The most frequently answered cause of the incident was due to a "failure to check thoroughly" with 1,293 (96.3) out of 1,343 reported cases of incidents from community pharmacies. In a comparison of incidents reported between hospital pharmacies and community hospitals, both types of pharmacies reported a "failure to check thoroughly" as the leading cause of incidents. In hospital pharmacies, however, only 3,265 (84.7%) cases out of 3,857 were reported with "failure to check thoroughly" as the cause of incident. The rates between hospital pharmacy and community pharmacy for this cause differed significantly (P, 0.05). As the main cause of incidents was due to "the failure to check thoroughly", the need for confirmation systems within community pharmacies has become ever more evident.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-179
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Risk
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Sep

Fingerprint

Pharmacies
incident
Japan
cause
community
Quality of Health Care
Community Hospital
Risk Management
health care
Prescriptions
medication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Law

Cite this

@article{da8b994f38ad4e9ab8b6c1a54f3a6a2f,
title = "Incidents within community pharmacies across Japan: An analysis of the newly launched incident collecting project among community pharmacies and a comparison of causes between hospital pharmacies and community pharmacies",
abstract = "In April 2009, Japan Council for Quality Health Care (JCQHC) launched the Project to Collect Incidents within Community Pharmacies, a national project of self-and-voluntary reporting of incidents among community pharmacies. While there have been several studies and projects to collect and analyze incident reports among a set number of community pharmacies across the globe, it is still rare for an incident collecting project to exist at a national level. This paper introduces the new project in Japan. A retrospective analysis of community pharmacy participation across the country and cause of reported incidents based on the data released by JCQHC. Among the total number of reported incidents (1,460 cases), the most frequently reported incidents were related to the task of filling out prescriptions (92.0{\%}). The most frequently answered cause of the incident was due to a {"}failure to check thoroughly{"} with 1,293 (96.3) out of 1,343 reported cases of incidents from community pharmacies. In a comparison of incidents reported between hospital pharmacies and community hospitals, both types of pharmacies reported a {"}failure to check thoroughly{"} as the leading cause of incidents. In hospital pharmacies, however, only 3,265 (84.7{\%}) cases out of 3,857 were reported with {"}failure to check thoroughly{"} as the cause of incident. The rates between hospital pharmacy and community pharmacy for this cause differed significantly (P, 0.05). As the main cause of incidents was due to {"}the failure to check thoroughly{"}, the need for confirmation systems within community pharmacies has become ever more evident.",
author = "Hisako Iijima and Aya Ishizuka and Shoichi Maeda",
year = "2011",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1258/cr.2011.011A09",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "174--179",
journal = "Clinical Risk",
issn = "1356-2622",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Incidents within community pharmacies across Japan

T2 - An analysis of the newly launched incident collecting project among community pharmacies and a comparison of causes between hospital pharmacies and community pharmacies

AU - Iijima, Hisako

AU - Ishizuka, Aya

AU - Maeda, Shoichi

PY - 2011/9

Y1 - 2011/9

N2 - In April 2009, Japan Council for Quality Health Care (JCQHC) launched the Project to Collect Incidents within Community Pharmacies, a national project of self-and-voluntary reporting of incidents among community pharmacies. While there have been several studies and projects to collect and analyze incident reports among a set number of community pharmacies across the globe, it is still rare for an incident collecting project to exist at a national level. This paper introduces the new project in Japan. A retrospective analysis of community pharmacy participation across the country and cause of reported incidents based on the data released by JCQHC. Among the total number of reported incidents (1,460 cases), the most frequently reported incidents were related to the task of filling out prescriptions (92.0%). The most frequently answered cause of the incident was due to a "failure to check thoroughly" with 1,293 (96.3) out of 1,343 reported cases of incidents from community pharmacies. In a comparison of incidents reported between hospital pharmacies and community hospitals, both types of pharmacies reported a "failure to check thoroughly" as the leading cause of incidents. In hospital pharmacies, however, only 3,265 (84.7%) cases out of 3,857 were reported with "failure to check thoroughly" as the cause of incident. The rates between hospital pharmacy and community pharmacy for this cause differed significantly (P, 0.05). As the main cause of incidents was due to "the failure to check thoroughly", the need for confirmation systems within community pharmacies has become ever more evident.

AB - In April 2009, Japan Council for Quality Health Care (JCQHC) launched the Project to Collect Incidents within Community Pharmacies, a national project of self-and-voluntary reporting of incidents among community pharmacies. While there have been several studies and projects to collect and analyze incident reports among a set number of community pharmacies across the globe, it is still rare for an incident collecting project to exist at a national level. This paper introduces the new project in Japan. A retrospective analysis of community pharmacy participation across the country and cause of reported incidents based on the data released by JCQHC. Among the total number of reported incidents (1,460 cases), the most frequently reported incidents were related to the task of filling out prescriptions (92.0%). The most frequently answered cause of the incident was due to a "failure to check thoroughly" with 1,293 (96.3) out of 1,343 reported cases of incidents from community pharmacies. In a comparison of incidents reported between hospital pharmacies and community hospitals, both types of pharmacies reported a "failure to check thoroughly" as the leading cause of incidents. In hospital pharmacies, however, only 3,265 (84.7%) cases out of 3,857 were reported with "failure to check thoroughly" as the cause of incident. The rates between hospital pharmacy and community pharmacy for this cause differed significantly (P, 0.05). As the main cause of incidents was due to "the failure to check thoroughly", the need for confirmation systems within community pharmacies has become ever more evident.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80052908717&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80052908717&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1258/cr.2011.011A09

DO - 10.1258/cr.2011.011A09

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:80052908717

VL - 17

SP - 174

EP - 179

JO - Clinical Risk

JF - Clinical Risk

SN - 1356-2622

IS - 5

ER -