Increased basal platelet activity, plasma adiponectin levels, and diabetes mellitus are associated with poor platelet responsiveness to in vitro effect of aspirin

Shinichi Takahashi, Miho Ushida, Risa Komine, Aya Shimizu, Toshihiro Uchida, Hiroaki Ishihara, Toshiro Shibano, Gentaro Watanabe, Yasuo Ikeda, Mitsuru Murata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Aspirin is one of the most effective antiplatelet agents and is now commonly used to prevent vascular events. In some patients, however, recurrent vascular events have been demonstrated despite aspirin therapy. Our objective was to characterize individuals showing poor response to in vitro effect of aspirin, using PFA-100. Methods: One hundred sixty-eight healthy male subjects were analyzed. We assessed platelet function tests, including PFA-100, whole blood aggregation, and optical platelet aggregation. Also measured were hemostatic and other parameters including von Willebrand factor (VWF:Ag), VWF ristocetin cofactor activity (VWF:RCo), soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and adiponectin. Poor responders were defined as having a collagen/epinephrine-induced closure time (CEPI-CT) under 250 s with PFA-100 when incubated with 10 μM aspirin, whereas good responders were defined as having a CEPI-CT of more than 250 s. Results and conclusions: PFA-100 tests revealed that 40 subjects (24%) were poor responders (PR) and 128 (76%) were good responders (GR). Poor responsiveness was significantly associated with (1) higher basal platelet activities in PFA-100, as well as in whole blood aggregation and aggregometer;(2) increased level of adiponectin (8.8 ± 4.1 μg/mL [PR] vs 7.3 ± 2.9 μg/mL [GR], p = 0.010);and (3) the presence of diabetes mellitus (17.5% [PR] vs 4.7% [GR], p = 0.009). Importantly, whereas 24% of the subjects showed insufficient inhibition in PFA-100 when incubated with 10 μM aspirin, almost all subjects showed maximum inhibition with 30 μM aspirin. These observations suggest that higher doses of aspirin might overcome aspirin resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)517-524
Number of pages8
JournalThrombosis Research
Volume119
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Adiponectin
Aspirin
Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Platelets
Blood Vessels
von Willebrand Factor
Epinephrine
Collagen
Platelet Function Tests
In Vitro Techniques
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Hemostatics
Platelet Aggregation
C-Reactive Protein
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • Adiponectin
  • Aspirin resistance
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Hyperplatelet activity
  • PFA-100

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Hematology

Cite this

Increased basal platelet activity, plasma adiponectin levels, and diabetes mellitus are associated with poor platelet responsiveness to in vitro effect of aspirin. / Takahashi, Shinichi; Ushida, Miho; Komine, Risa; Shimizu, Aya; Uchida, Toshihiro; Ishihara, Hiroaki; Shibano, Toshiro; Watanabe, Gentaro; Ikeda, Yasuo; Murata, Mitsuru.

In: Thrombosis Research, Vol. 119, No. 4, 2007, p. 517-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takahashi, Shinichi ; Ushida, Miho ; Komine, Risa ; Shimizu, Aya ; Uchida, Toshihiro ; Ishihara, Hiroaki ; Shibano, Toshiro ; Watanabe, Gentaro ; Ikeda, Yasuo ; Murata, Mitsuru. / Increased basal platelet activity, plasma adiponectin levels, and diabetes mellitus are associated with poor platelet responsiveness to in vitro effect of aspirin. In: Thrombosis Research. 2007 ; Vol. 119, No. 4. pp. 517-524.
@article{c8ea968c8b7d4900b11397c685a6c9f8,
title = "Increased basal platelet activity, plasma adiponectin levels, and diabetes mellitus are associated with poor platelet responsiveness to in vitro effect of aspirin",
abstract = "Introduction: Aspirin is one of the most effective antiplatelet agents and is now commonly used to prevent vascular events. In some patients, however, recurrent vascular events have been demonstrated despite aspirin therapy. Our objective was to characterize individuals showing poor response to in vitro effect of aspirin, using PFA-100. Methods: One hundred sixty-eight healthy male subjects were analyzed. We assessed platelet function tests, including PFA-100, whole blood aggregation, and optical platelet aggregation. Also measured were hemostatic and other parameters including von Willebrand factor (VWF:Ag), VWF ristocetin cofactor activity (VWF:RCo), soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and adiponectin. Poor responders were defined as having a collagen/epinephrine-induced closure time (CEPI-CT) under 250 s with PFA-100 when incubated with 10 μM aspirin, whereas good responders were defined as having a CEPI-CT of more than 250 s. Results and conclusions: PFA-100 tests revealed that 40 subjects (24{\%}) were poor responders (PR) and 128 (76{\%}) were good responders (GR). Poor responsiveness was significantly associated with (1) higher basal platelet activities in PFA-100, as well as in whole blood aggregation and aggregometer;(2) increased level of adiponectin (8.8 ± 4.1 μg/mL [PR] vs 7.3 ± 2.9 μg/mL [GR], p = 0.010);and (3) the presence of diabetes mellitus (17.5{\%} [PR] vs 4.7{\%} [GR], p = 0.009). Importantly, whereas 24{\%} of the subjects showed insufficient inhibition in PFA-100 when incubated with 10 μM aspirin, almost all subjects showed maximum inhibition with 30 μM aspirin. These observations suggest that higher doses of aspirin might overcome aspirin resistance.",
keywords = "Adiponectin, Aspirin resistance, Diabetes mellitus, Hyperplatelet activity, PFA-100",
author = "Shinichi Takahashi and Miho Ushida and Risa Komine and Aya Shimizu and Toshihiro Uchida and Hiroaki Ishihara and Toshiro Shibano and Gentaro Watanabe and Yasuo Ikeda and Mitsuru Murata",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1016/j.thromres.2006.04.004",
language = "English",
volume = "119",
pages = "517--524",
journal = "Thrombosis Research",
issn = "0049-3848",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increased basal platelet activity, plasma adiponectin levels, and diabetes mellitus are associated with poor platelet responsiveness to in vitro effect of aspirin

AU - Takahashi, Shinichi

AU - Ushida, Miho

AU - Komine, Risa

AU - Shimizu, Aya

AU - Uchida, Toshihiro

AU - Ishihara, Hiroaki

AU - Shibano, Toshiro

AU - Watanabe, Gentaro

AU - Ikeda, Yasuo

AU - Murata, Mitsuru

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Introduction: Aspirin is one of the most effective antiplatelet agents and is now commonly used to prevent vascular events. In some patients, however, recurrent vascular events have been demonstrated despite aspirin therapy. Our objective was to characterize individuals showing poor response to in vitro effect of aspirin, using PFA-100. Methods: One hundred sixty-eight healthy male subjects were analyzed. We assessed platelet function tests, including PFA-100, whole blood aggregation, and optical platelet aggregation. Also measured were hemostatic and other parameters including von Willebrand factor (VWF:Ag), VWF ristocetin cofactor activity (VWF:RCo), soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and adiponectin. Poor responders were defined as having a collagen/epinephrine-induced closure time (CEPI-CT) under 250 s with PFA-100 when incubated with 10 μM aspirin, whereas good responders were defined as having a CEPI-CT of more than 250 s. Results and conclusions: PFA-100 tests revealed that 40 subjects (24%) were poor responders (PR) and 128 (76%) were good responders (GR). Poor responsiveness was significantly associated with (1) higher basal platelet activities in PFA-100, as well as in whole blood aggregation and aggregometer;(2) increased level of adiponectin (8.8 ± 4.1 μg/mL [PR] vs 7.3 ± 2.9 μg/mL [GR], p = 0.010);and (3) the presence of diabetes mellitus (17.5% [PR] vs 4.7% [GR], p = 0.009). Importantly, whereas 24% of the subjects showed insufficient inhibition in PFA-100 when incubated with 10 μM aspirin, almost all subjects showed maximum inhibition with 30 μM aspirin. These observations suggest that higher doses of aspirin might overcome aspirin resistance.

AB - Introduction: Aspirin is one of the most effective antiplatelet agents and is now commonly used to prevent vascular events. In some patients, however, recurrent vascular events have been demonstrated despite aspirin therapy. Our objective was to characterize individuals showing poor response to in vitro effect of aspirin, using PFA-100. Methods: One hundred sixty-eight healthy male subjects were analyzed. We assessed platelet function tests, including PFA-100, whole blood aggregation, and optical platelet aggregation. Also measured were hemostatic and other parameters including von Willebrand factor (VWF:Ag), VWF ristocetin cofactor activity (VWF:RCo), soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and adiponectin. Poor responders were defined as having a collagen/epinephrine-induced closure time (CEPI-CT) under 250 s with PFA-100 when incubated with 10 μM aspirin, whereas good responders were defined as having a CEPI-CT of more than 250 s. Results and conclusions: PFA-100 tests revealed that 40 subjects (24%) were poor responders (PR) and 128 (76%) were good responders (GR). Poor responsiveness was significantly associated with (1) higher basal platelet activities in PFA-100, as well as in whole blood aggregation and aggregometer;(2) increased level of adiponectin (8.8 ± 4.1 μg/mL [PR] vs 7.3 ± 2.9 μg/mL [GR], p = 0.010);and (3) the presence of diabetes mellitus (17.5% [PR] vs 4.7% [GR], p = 0.009). Importantly, whereas 24% of the subjects showed insufficient inhibition in PFA-100 when incubated with 10 μM aspirin, almost all subjects showed maximum inhibition with 30 μM aspirin. These observations suggest that higher doses of aspirin might overcome aspirin resistance.

KW - Adiponectin

KW - Aspirin resistance

KW - Diabetes mellitus

KW - Hyperplatelet activity

KW - PFA-100

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846413188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846413188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.thromres.2006.04.004

DO - 10.1016/j.thromres.2006.04.004

M3 - Article

C2 - 16793119

AN - SCOPUS:33846413188

VL - 119

SP - 517

EP - 524

JO - Thrombosis Research

JF - Thrombosis Research

SN - 0049-3848

IS - 4

ER -