Increased predominance of the matured ventricular subtype in embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in vivo

Hajime Ichimura, Shin Kadota, Toshihide Kashihara, Mitsuhiko Yamada, Kuniaki Ito, Hideki Kobayashi, Yuki Tanaka, Naoko Shiba, Shinichiro Chuma, Shugo Tohyama, Tatsuichiro Seto, Kenji Okada, Koichiro Kuwahara, Yuji Shiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Accumulating evidence suggests that human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes can affect “heart regeneration”, replacing injured cardiac scar tissue with concomitant electrical integration. However, electrically coupled graft cardiomyocytes were found to innately induce transient post-transplant ventricular tachycardia in recent large animal model transplantation studies. We hypothesised that these phenomena were derived from alterations in the grafted cardiomyocyte characteristics. In vitro experiments showed that human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) contain nodal-like cardiomyocytes that spontaneously contract faster than working-type cardiomyocytes. When transplanted into athymic rat hearts, proliferative capacity was lower for nodal-like than working-type cardiomyocytes with grafted cardiomyocytes eventually comprising only relatively matured ventricular cardiomyocytes. RNA-sequencing of engrafted hESC-CMs confirmed the increased expression of matured ventricular cardiomyocyte-related genes, and simultaneous decreased expression of nodal cardiomyocyte-related genes. Temporal engraftment of electrical excitable nodal-like cardiomyocytes may thus explain the transient incidence of post-transplant ventricular tachycardia, although further large animal model studies will be required to control post-transplant arrhythmia.

Original languageEnglish
Article number11883
JournalScientific reports
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Dec 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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