[Infantile meningitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus].

G. Shirota, Miyuki Morozumi, Kimiko Ubukata, Hiroyuki Shiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial (RS) virus commonly causes infantile respiratory tract infection causing significant morbidity and mortality, but rarely meningitis. We report a case of meningitis caused by RS virus subgroup B in a 56-day-old boy admitted for high fever who underwent blood examination and lumbar puncture. Empirical chemotherapy was started with intravenous ampicillin, gentamicin, and cefotaxime based on laboratory data on CSF cells (84/microL) and serum CRP (13.8mg/dL) data. RS virus subgroup B was only detected using real-time PCR comprehensive reverse transcription from the first CSF, but no bacterial gene was detected. No bacteria grew from his CSF, urine, or blood. Fever and serum CRP dropped in a few days. He had neither seizures nor disturbance of consciousness and was discharged on day 11 after admission. No evidence of encephalopathy was detected in brain MRI or electroencephalography. RS virus rarely causes meningitis, but a percentage of RS-virus-infected infants exhibit symptoms such as seizure and disturbance of consciousness. We should recognize that the RS virus may cause neurological complications associated with high morbidity and mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)682-685
Number of pages4
JournalKansenshōgaku zasshi. The Journal of the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases
Volume85
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Nov
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Meningitis
Consciousness
Seizures
Fever
Morbidity
Bacterial Genes
Spinal Puncture
Cefotaxime
Mortality
Brain Diseases
Ampicillin
Gentamicins
Serum
Respiratory Tract Infections
Reverse Transcription
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Electroencephalography
Urine
Bacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

[Infantile meningitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus]. / Shirota, G.; Morozumi, Miyuki; Ubukata, Kimiko; Shiro, Hiroyuki.

In: Kansenshōgaku zasshi. The Journal of the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases, Vol. 85, No. 6, 11.2011, p. 682-685.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6ed9b88fe13942dab464839a6a77423e,
title = "[Infantile meningitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus].",
abstract = "Respiratory syncytial (RS) virus commonly causes infantile respiratory tract infection causing significant morbidity and mortality, but rarely meningitis. We report a case of meningitis caused by RS virus subgroup B in a 56-day-old boy admitted for high fever who underwent blood examination and lumbar puncture. Empirical chemotherapy was started with intravenous ampicillin, gentamicin, and cefotaxime based on laboratory data on CSF cells (84/microL) and serum CRP (13.8mg/dL) data. RS virus subgroup B was only detected using real-time PCR comprehensive reverse transcription from the first CSF, but no bacterial gene was detected. No bacteria grew from his CSF, urine, or blood. Fever and serum CRP dropped in a few days. He had neither seizures nor disturbance of consciousness and was discharged on day 11 after admission. No evidence of encephalopathy was detected in brain MRI or electroencephalography. RS virus rarely causes meningitis, but a percentage of RS-virus-infected infants exhibit symptoms such as seizure and disturbance of consciousness. We should recognize that the RS virus may cause neurological complications associated with high morbidity and mortality.",
author = "G. Shirota and Miyuki Morozumi and Kimiko Ubukata and Hiroyuki Shiro",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
language = "English",
volume = "85",
pages = "682--685",
journal = "Nippon Densenbyo Gakkai zasshi",
issn = "0387-5911",
publisher = "Nihon Kansensho Gakkai",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - [Infantile meningitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus].

AU - Shirota, G.

AU - Morozumi, Miyuki

AU - Ubukata, Kimiko

AU - Shiro, Hiroyuki

PY - 2011/11

Y1 - 2011/11

N2 - Respiratory syncytial (RS) virus commonly causes infantile respiratory tract infection causing significant morbidity and mortality, but rarely meningitis. We report a case of meningitis caused by RS virus subgroup B in a 56-day-old boy admitted for high fever who underwent blood examination and lumbar puncture. Empirical chemotherapy was started with intravenous ampicillin, gentamicin, and cefotaxime based on laboratory data on CSF cells (84/microL) and serum CRP (13.8mg/dL) data. RS virus subgroup B was only detected using real-time PCR comprehensive reverse transcription from the first CSF, but no bacterial gene was detected. No bacteria grew from his CSF, urine, or blood. Fever and serum CRP dropped in a few days. He had neither seizures nor disturbance of consciousness and was discharged on day 11 after admission. No evidence of encephalopathy was detected in brain MRI or electroencephalography. RS virus rarely causes meningitis, but a percentage of RS-virus-infected infants exhibit symptoms such as seizure and disturbance of consciousness. We should recognize that the RS virus may cause neurological complications associated with high morbidity and mortality.

AB - Respiratory syncytial (RS) virus commonly causes infantile respiratory tract infection causing significant morbidity and mortality, but rarely meningitis. We report a case of meningitis caused by RS virus subgroup B in a 56-day-old boy admitted for high fever who underwent blood examination and lumbar puncture. Empirical chemotherapy was started with intravenous ampicillin, gentamicin, and cefotaxime based on laboratory data on CSF cells (84/microL) and serum CRP (13.8mg/dL) data. RS virus subgroup B was only detected using real-time PCR comprehensive reverse transcription from the first CSF, but no bacterial gene was detected. No bacteria grew from his CSF, urine, or blood. Fever and serum CRP dropped in a few days. He had neither seizures nor disturbance of consciousness and was discharged on day 11 after admission. No evidence of encephalopathy was detected in brain MRI or electroencephalography. RS virus rarely causes meningitis, but a percentage of RS-virus-infected infants exhibit symptoms such as seizure and disturbance of consciousness. We should recognize that the RS virus may cause neurological complications associated with high morbidity and mortality.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84857163525&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84857163525&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 85

SP - 682

EP - 685

JO - Nippon Densenbyo Gakkai zasshi

JF - Nippon Densenbyo Gakkai zasshi

SN - 0387-5911

IS - 6

ER -