Inflammation, But Not Telomere Length, Predicts Successful Ageing at Extreme Old Age: A Longitudinal Study of Semi-supercentenarians

Yasumichi Arai, Carmen M. Martin-Ruiz, Michiyo Takayama, Yukiko Abe, Toru Takebayashi, Shigeo Koyasu, Makoto Suematsu, Nobuyoshi Hirose, Thomas von Zglinicki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the most important drivers of successful ageing at extreme old age, we combined community-based prospective cohorts: Tokyo Oldest Old Survey on Total Health (TOOTH), Tokyo Centenarians Study (TCS) and Japanese Semi-Supercentenarians Study (JSS) comprising 1554 individuals including 684 centenarians and (semi-)supercentenarians, 167 pairs of centenarian offspring and spouses, and 536 community-living very old (85 to 99years). We combined z scores from multiple biomarkers to describe haematopoiesis, inflammation, lipid and glucose metabolism, liver function, renal function, and cellular senescence domains. In Cox proportional hazard models, inflammation predicted all-cause mortality with hazard ratios (95% CI) 1.89 (1.21 to 2.95) and 1.36 (1.05 to 1.78) in the very old and (semi-)supercentenarians, respectively. In linear forward stepwise models, inflammation predicted capability (10.8% variance explained) and cognition (8.6% variance explained) in (semi-)supercentenarians better than chronologic age or gender. The inflammation score was also lower in centenarian offspring compared to age-matched controls with δ (95% CI)=-0.795 (-1.436 to -0.154). Centenarians and their offspring were able to maintain long telomeres, but telomere length was not a predictor of successful ageing in centenarians and semi-supercentenarians. We conclude that inflammation is an important malleable driver of ageing up to extreme old age in humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1549-1558
Number of pages10
JournalEBioMedicine
Volume2
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Oct 1

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Telomere
Longitudinal Studies
Aging of materials
Inflammation
Hazards
Biomarkers
Tokyo
Metabolism
Liver
Health
Lipids
Glucose
Cell Aging
Hematopoiesis
Spouses
Lipid Metabolism
Proportional Hazards Models
Cognition
Kidney
Mortality

Keywords

  • Ageing
  • Centenarian
  • Inflammation
  • Telomere

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Inflammation, But Not Telomere Length, Predicts Successful Ageing at Extreme Old Age : A Longitudinal Study of Semi-supercentenarians. / Arai, Yasumichi; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen M.; Takayama, Michiyo; Abe, Yukiko; Takebayashi, Toru; Koyasu, Shigeo; Suematsu, Makoto; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; von Zglinicki, Thomas.

In: EBioMedicine, Vol. 2, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 1549-1558.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arai, Yasumichi ; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen M. ; Takayama, Michiyo ; Abe, Yukiko ; Takebayashi, Toru ; Koyasu, Shigeo ; Suematsu, Makoto ; Hirose, Nobuyoshi ; von Zglinicki, Thomas. / Inflammation, But Not Telomere Length, Predicts Successful Ageing at Extreme Old Age : A Longitudinal Study of Semi-supercentenarians. In: EBioMedicine. 2015 ; Vol. 2, No. 10. pp. 1549-1558.
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