Influence of blood pressure on the effects of low-dose asprin in elderly patients with multiple atherosclerotic risks

Japanese Primary Prevention Project (JPPP) Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We examined whether the efficacy of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) for primary prevention of cardiovascular events is influenced by blood pressure (BP) using data from patients aged 60-85 years with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and/or diabetes, but without cardiovascular disease of the Japanese Primary Prevention Project. METHODS: All patients had received aspirin (100 mg/day) or no aspirin. BP subgroups were defined as low (average SBP from the baseline to the year of the events <130 mmHg), moderate (≥130 and <140 mmHg), and high (≥140 mmHg). The mean duration of follow-up was 5.02 years. RESULTS: In hypertensive patients (n = 12 278) aspirin had no significant impact on the primary outcome of death from cardiovascular disease, nonfatal stroke, and nonfatal myocardial infarction. On the other hand, aspirin increased the incidence of serious extracranial hemorrhage [hazard ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18-2.77; P = 0.0064] and tended to increase hemorrhagic stroke (hazard ratio, 1.75; CI, 0.99-3.07; P = 0.053). Aspirin had no effect on the primary outcome in any of the BP subgroups, and was associated with increased hemorrhagic stroke in the high BP group (hazard ratio, 3.51; CI, 1.29-9.51; P = 0.014); serious extracranial hemorrhage was elevated or tended to elevate in the moderate (hazard ratio, 2.53; CI, 1.18-5.45; P = 0.017) and high (hazard ratio, 2.14; CI, 1.00-4.56; P = 0.050) BP groups. CONCLUSION: In aged Japanese hypertensive patients, these data demonstrated no overall benefit of low-dose aspirin therapy although treatment was associated with an elevated risk of hemorrhagic events.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1301-1307
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of hypertension
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jun 1

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Aspirin
Blood Pressure
Confidence Intervals
Stroke
Primary Prevention
Blood Group Antigens
Cardiovascular Diseases
Hemorrhage
Hypertension
Dyslipidemias
Myocardial Infarction
Incidence
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Influence of blood pressure on the effects of low-dose asprin in elderly patients with multiple atherosclerotic risks. / Japanese Primary Prevention Project (JPPP) Study Group.

In: Journal of hypertension, Vol. 37, No. 6, 01.06.2019, p. 1301-1307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Japanese Primary Prevention Project (JPPP) Study Group. / Influence of blood pressure on the effects of low-dose asprin in elderly patients with multiple atherosclerotic risks. In: Journal of hypertension. 2019 ; Vol. 37, No. 6. pp. 1301-1307.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: We examined whether the efficacy of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) for primary prevention of cardiovascular events is influenced by blood pressure (BP) using data from patients aged 60-85 years with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and/or diabetes, but without cardiovascular disease of the Japanese Primary Prevention Project. METHODS: All patients had received aspirin (100 mg/day) or no aspirin. BP subgroups were defined as low (average SBP from the baseline to the year of the events <130 mmHg), moderate (≥130 and <140 mmHg), and high (≥140 mmHg). The mean duration of follow-up was 5.02 years. RESULTS: In hypertensive patients (n = 12 278) aspirin had no significant impact on the primary outcome of death from cardiovascular disease, nonfatal stroke, and nonfatal myocardial infarction. On the other hand, aspirin increased the incidence of serious extracranial hemorrhage [hazard ratio, 1.81; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 1.18-2.77; P = 0.0064] and tended to increase hemorrhagic stroke (hazard ratio, 1.75; CI, 0.99-3.07; P = 0.053). Aspirin had no effect on the primary outcome in any of the BP subgroups, and was associated with increased hemorrhagic stroke in the high BP group (hazard ratio, 3.51; CI, 1.29-9.51; P = 0.014); serious extracranial hemorrhage was elevated or tended to elevate in the moderate (hazard ratio, 2.53; CI, 1.18-5.45; P = 0.017) and high (hazard ratio, 2.14; CI, 1.00-4.56; P = 0.050) BP groups. CONCLUSION: In aged Japanese hypertensive patients, these data demonstrated no overall benefit of low-dose aspirin therapy although treatment was associated with an elevated risk of hemorrhagic events.",
author = "{Japanese Primary Prevention Project (JPPP) Study Group} and Katsuyuki Ando and Kazuyuki Shimada and Tsutomu Yamazaki and Shinichiro Uchiyama and Yukari Uemura and Naoki Ishizuka and Tamio Teramoto and Shinichi Oikawa and Masahiro Sugawara and Mitsuru Murata and Kenji Yokoyama and Yasuo Ikeda",
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T1 - Influence of blood pressure on the effects of low-dose asprin in elderly patients with multiple atherosclerotic risks

AU - Japanese Primary Prevention Project (JPPP) Study Group

AU - Ando, Katsuyuki

AU - Shimada, Kazuyuki

AU - Yamazaki, Tsutomu

AU - Uchiyama, Shinichiro

AU - Uemura, Yukari

AU - Ishizuka, Naoki

AU - Teramoto, Tamio

AU - Oikawa, Shinichi

AU - Sugawara, Masahiro

AU - Murata, Mitsuru

AU - Yokoyama, Kenji

AU - Ikeda, Yasuo

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: We examined whether the efficacy of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) for primary prevention of cardiovascular events is influenced by blood pressure (BP) using data from patients aged 60-85 years with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and/or diabetes, but without cardiovascular disease of the Japanese Primary Prevention Project. METHODS: All patients had received aspirin (100 mg/day) or no aspirin. BP subgroups were defined as low (average SBP from the baseline to the year of the events <130 mmHg), moderate (≥130 and <140 mmHg), and high (≥140 mmHg). The mean duration of follow-up was 5.02 years. RESULTS: In hypertensive patients (n = 12 278) aspirin had no significant impact on the primary outcome of death from cardiovascular disease, nonfatal stroke, and nonfatal myocardial infarction. On the other hand, aspirin increased the incidence of serious extracranial hemorrhage [hazard ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18-2.77; P = 0.0064] and tended to increase hemorrhagic stroke (hazard ratio, 1.75; CI, 0.99-3.07; P = 0.053). Aspirin had no effect on the primary outcome in any of the BP subgroups, and was associated with increased hemorrhagic stroke in the high BP group (hazard ratio, 3.51; CI, 1.29-9.51; P = 0.014); serious extracranial hemorrhage was elevated or tended to elevate in the moderate (hazard ratio, 2.53; CI, 1.18-5.45; P = 0.017) and high (hazard ratio, 2.14; CI, 1.00-4.56; P = 0.050) BP groups. CONCLUSION: In aged Japanese hypertensive patients, these data demonstrated no overall benefit of low-dose aspirin therapy although treatment was associated with an elevated risk of hemorrhagic events.

AB - OBJECTIVE: We examined whether the efficacy of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) for primary prevention of cardiovascular events is influenced by blood pressure (BP) using data from patients aged 60-85 years with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and/or diabetes, but without cardiovascular disease of the Japanese Primary Prevention Project. METHODS: All patients had received aspirin (100 mg/day) or no aspirin. BP subgroups were defined as low (average SBP from the baseline to the year of the events <130 mmHg), moderate (≥130 and <140 mmHg), and high (≥140 mmHg). The mean duration of follow-up was 5.02 years. RESULTS: In hypertensive patients (n = 12 278) aspirin had no significant impact on the primary outcome of death from cardiovascular disease, nonfatal stroke, and nonfatal myocardial infarction. On the other hand, aspirin increased the incidence of serious extracranial hemorrhage [hazard ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18-2.77; P = 0.0064] and tended to increase hemorrhagic stroke (hazard ratio, 1.75; CI, 0.99-3.07; P = 0.053). Aspirin had no effect on the primary outcome in any of the BP subgroups, and was associated with increased hemorrhagic stroke in the high BP group (hazard ratio, 3.51; CI, 1.29-9.51; P = 0.014); serious extracranial hemorrhage was elevated or tended to elevate in the moderate (hazard ratio, 2.53; CI, 1.18-5.45; P = 0.017) and high (hazard ratio, 2.14; CI, 1.00-4.56; P = 0.050) BP groups. CONCLUSION: In aged Japanese hypertensive patients, these data demonstrated no overall benefit of low-dose aspirin therapy although treatment was associated with an elevated risk of hemorrhagic events.

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