Injustice experience questionnaire, Japanese version

Cross-cultural factor-structure comparison and demographics associated with perceived injustice

Keiko Yamada, Tomonori Adachi, Akira Mibu, Tomohiko Nishigami, Yasushi Motoyama, Hironobu Uematsu, Yoichi Matsuda, Hitoaki Sato, Kenichi Hayashi, Renzhe Cui, Yumiko Takao, Masahiko Shibata, Hiroyasu Iso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The Injustice Experience Questionnaire (IEQ) assesses injury-related perceived injustice. This study aimed to (1) develop a Japanese version (IEQ-J), (2) examine its factor structure, validity, and reliability, and (3) discover which demographic variable(s) positively contributed to prediction of IEQ-J scores. Methods: Data from 71 patients (33 male, 38 female; age = 20+) with injury pain were employed to investigate factor structure by exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Concurrent validity was examined by Pearson correlation coefficients among the IEQ-J, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Internal consistency was investigated by Cronbach's alpha, and test-retest reliability was indicated with intra-class correlations (ICCs) in 42 of 71 patients within four weeks. Relations between demographic variables and IEQ-J scores were examined by covariance analysis and linear regression models. Results: IEQ-J factor structure differed from the original two-factor model. A three-factor model with Severity/irreparability, Blame/unfairness, and Perceived lack of empathy was extracted. The three-factor model showed goodness-of-fit with the data and sufficient reliability (Cronbach's alpha of 0.90 for total IEQ-J; ICCs = 0.96). Pearson correlation coefficients among IEQ-J, BPI, and PCS ranged from 0.38 to 0.73. Pain duration over a year (regression coefficient, 11.92, 95%CI; 5.95-17.89) and liability for injury on another (regression coefficient, 12.17, 95%CI; 6.38-17.96) predicted IEQ-J total scores. Conclusions: This study evidenced the IEQ-J's sound psychometric properties. The three-factor model was the latter distinctive in the Japanese version. Pain duration over a year and injury liability by another statistically significantly increased IEQ-J scores.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0160567
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Aug 1

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demographic statistics
questionnaires
Demography
pain
Pain
Catastrophization
Wounds and Injuries
Linear regression
Reproducibility of Results
Linear Models
Surveys and Questionnaires
Acoustic waves
Equipment and Supplies
duration
Psychometrics
Statistical Factor Analysis
prediction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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Injustice experience questionnaire, Japanese version : Cross-cultural factor-structure comparison and demographics associated with perceived injustice. / Yamada, Keiko; Adachi, Tomonori; Mibu, Akira; Nishigami, Tomohiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Uematsu, Hironobu; Matsuda, Yoichi; Sato, Hitoaki; Hayashi, Kenichi; Cui, Renzhe; Takao, Yumiko; Shibata, Masahiko; Iso, Hiroyasu.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 8, e0160567, 01.08.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamada, K, Adachi, T, Mibu, A, Nishigami, T, Motoyama, Y, Uematsu, H, Matsuda, Y, Sato, H, Hayashi, K, Cui, R, Takao, Y, Shibata, M & Iso, H 2016, 'Injustice experience questionnaire, Japanese version: Cross-cultural factor-structure comparison and demographics associated with perceived injustice', PLoS One, vol. 11, no. 8, e0160567. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0160567
Yamada, Keiko ; Adachi, Tomonori ; Mibu, Akira ; Nishigami, Tomohiko ; Motoyama, Yasushi ; Uematsu, Hironobu ; Matsuda, Yoichi ; Sato, Hitoaki ; Hayashi, Kenichi ; Cui, Renzhe ; Takao, Yumiko ; Shibata, Masahiko ; Iso, Hiroyasu. / Injustice experience questionnaire, Japanese version : Cross-cultural factor-structure comparison and demographics associated with perceived injustice. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 8.
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abstract = "Objective: The Injustice Experience Questionnaire (IEQ) assesses injury-related perceived injustice. This study aimed to (1) develop a Japanese version (IEQ-J), (2) examine its factor structure, validity, and reliability, and (3) discover which demographic variable(s) positively contributed to prediction of IEQ-J scores. Methods: Data from 71 patients (33 male, 38 female; age = 20+) with injury pain were employed to investigate factor structure by exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Concurrent validity was examined by Pearson correlation coefficients among the IEQ-J, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Internal consistency was investigated by Cronbach's alpha, and test-retest reliability was indicated with intra-class correlations (ICCs) in 42 of 71 patients within four weeks. Relations between demographic variables and IEQ-J scores were examined by covariance analysis and linear regression models. Results: IEQ-J factor structure differed from the original two-factor model. A three-factor model with Severity/irreparability, Blame/unfairness, and Perceived lack of empathy was extracted. The three-factor model showed goodness-of-fit with the data and sufficient reliability (Cronbach's alpha of 0.90 for total IEQ-J; ICCs = 0.96). Pearson correlation coefficients among IEQ-J, BPI, and PCS ranged from 0.38 to 0.73. Pain duration over a year (regression coefficient, 11.92, 95{\%}CI; 5.95-17.89) and liability for injury on another (regression coefficient, 12.17, 95{\%}CI; 6.38-17.96) predicted IEQ-J total scores. Conclusions: This study evidenced the IEQ-J's sound psychometric properties. The three-factor model was the latter distinctive in the Japanese version. Pain duration over a year and injury liability by another statistically significantly increased IEQ-J scores.",
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AU - Motoyama, Yasushi

AU - Uematsu, Hironobu

AU - Matsuda, Yoichi

AU - Sato, Hitoaki

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