Interaction Rating Scale (IRS) as an evidence-based practical index of children's social skills and parenting

Tokie Anme, Ryoji Shinohara, Yuka Sugisawa, Lian Tong, Emiko Tanaka, Taeko Watanabe, Yoko Onda, Yuri Kawashima, Maki Hirano, Etsuko Tomisaki, Yukiko Mochizuki, Kentaro Morita, Amarsanaa Gan-Yadam, Yuko Yato, Noriko Yamakawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this paper is to describe the features of the Interaction Rating Scale (IRS) as an evidence-based practical index of children's social skills and parenting. Methods: The participants in our study, which was conducted as part of a Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) project, were 370 dyads of children (aged 18, 30, and 42 month) and 81 dyads of 7-year-old children with their caregivers. The participants completed the five minute interaction session and were observed using the IRS. Results: The results indicated that the IRS can measure children's social skill development and parenting with high validity. Along with the discriminate validity for pervasive development disorder (PDD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), abuse and maltreatment, a high correlation with the SDQ (Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire), and high reliability, the IRS is effective in describing features of social skill development. Conclusions: The IRS provides further evidence of the fact that in order to study children's social skill development, it is important to evaluate various features of the caregiver-child interaction as a predictor of social skills.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Epidemiology
Volume20
Issue numberSUPPL.2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

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Parenting
Caregivers
Pervasive Child Development Disorders
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Social Skills
Japan
Technology

Keywords

  • Cohort study
  • Interaction
  • Parenting
  • Scale
  • Social development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Anme, T., Shinohara, R., Sugisawa, Y., Tong, L., Tanaka, E., Watanabe, T., ... Yamakawa, N. (2010). Interaction Rating Scale (IRS) as an evidence-based practical index of children's social skills and parenting. Journal of Epidemiology, 20(SUPPL.2). https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.JE20090171

Interaction Rating Scale (IRS) as an evidence-based practical index of children's social skills and parenting. / Anme, Tokie; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tong, Lian; Tanaka, Emiko; Watanabe, Taeko; Onda, Yoko; Kawashima, Yuri; Hirano, Maki; Tomisaki, Etsuko; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Morita, Kentaro; Gan-Yadam, Amarsanaa; Yato, Yuko; Yamakawa, Noriko.

In: Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 20, No. SUPPL.2, 01.12.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anme, T, Shinohara, R, Sugisawa, Y, Tong, L, Tanaka, E, Watanabe, T, Onda, Y, Kawashima, Y, Hirano, M, Tomisaki, E, Mochizuki, Y, Morita, K, Gan-Yadam, A, Yato, Y & Yamakawa, N 2010, 'Interaction Rating Scale (IRS) as an evidence-based practical index of children's social skills and parenting', Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 20, no. SUPPL.2. https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.JE20090171
Anme, Tokie ; Shinohara, Ryoji ; Sugisawa, Yuka ; Tong, Lian ; Tanaka, Emiko ; Watanabe, Taeko ; Onda, Yoko ; Kawashima, Yuri ; Hirano, Maki ; Tomisaki, Etsuko ; Mochizuki, Yukiko ; Morita, Kentaro ; Gan-Yadam, Amarsanaa ; Yato, Yuko ; Yamakawa, Noriko. / Interaction Rating Scale (IRS) as an evidence-based practical index of children's social skills and parenting. In: Journal of Epidemiology. 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. SUPPL.2.
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