Intractable bacterial infections in surgical patients

N. Aikawa, Y. Shinozawa, K. Takuma, S. Hori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although many new antibiotics became available for clinical use, intractable bacterial infections are still major cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. The infections are attributable to multiple factors. Surgical stress such as extensive burns and major surgery results in the depressed host-defense function, which is mediated by cytokine responses. Necrotic tissue, ischemia, hematoma, cholelithiasis, foreign bodies, indwelling catheters, intra-tracheal tubes, and other medical devices are local factors making infection resistant to ordinary chemotherapy. Multi-resistant bacteria such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas, and ampicillin resistant enterococci are the main bacteria causing the infections. 32% of surgical specimens isolated two or more bacteria, making the chemotherapy difficult in clinical setting. Importance of surgical drainage, removal of necrosis and the devices are emphasized.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)468-473
Number of pages6
JournalNippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine
Volume52
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1994 Feb

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Bacterial Infections
Bacteria
Infection
Device Removal
Drug Therapy
Indwelling Catheters
Cholelithiasis
Enterococcus
Ampicillin
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Pseudomonas
Foreign Bodies
Burns
Hematoma
Drainage
Necrosis
Ischemia
Cytokines
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Aikawa, N., Shinozawa, Y., Takuma, K., & Hori, S. (1994). Intractable bacterial infections in surgical patients. Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine, 52(2), 468-473.

Intractable bacterial infections in surgical patients. / Aikawa, N.; Shinozawa, Y.; Takuma, K.; Hori, S.

In: Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine, Vol. 52, No. 2, 02.1994, p. 468-473.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aikawa, N, Shinozawa, Y, Takuma, K & Hori, S 1994, 'Intractable bacterial infections in surgical patients', Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine, vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 468-473.
Aikawa, N. ; Shinozawa, Y. ; Takuma, K. ; Hori, S. / Intractable bacterial infections in surgical patients. In: Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine. 1994 ; Vol. 52, No. 2. pp. 468-473.
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