Investigation of metabolic factors associated with eGFR decline over 1 year in a Japanese population without CKD

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Abstract

Aim: Early intervention before the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is essential to prevent end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and cardiovascular complications. This study evaluated the correlation between metabolic and lifestyle-related factors and the decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over 1 year in a Japanese population without CKD. Methods: Subjects who received two consecutive annual health checkups from 2013 to 2015 were involved. Factors associated with eGFR decline were identified using multiple regression models. Results: A total of 2531 subjects aged 58.9±11.7 years old were included in this study. Baseline levels of HDL-C and ApoA1 correlated with the eGFR decline over 1 year defined as eGFR reduction rate of 15% or more and/or eGFR at the next year <60 ml/min/m2 (odds ratio (OR) 0.87 (per 10 mg/dl); 95% CI, 0.80–0.94; p=0.0012, 0.90 (per 10 mg/dl); 0.86–0.96; p=0.0004, respectively). A U-shaped relationship between the eGFR decline and HDL-C or ApoA1 levels was not observed in non-CKD population of this study. Metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with eGFR decline (OR 1.32; 1.04–1.67; p=0.0205), although obesity-related factors did not show a significant correlation with eGFR decline over 1 year. Conclusion: Low HDL-C and ApoA1 levels significantly correlated with eGFR decline in a short period of 1 year. Metabolic syndrome also showed a significant association with eGFR decline. This study suggests the importance of hypertension and low HDL-C in the metabolic syndrome effect on eGFR decline rather than obesity in non-CKD population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)863-875
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Glomerular Filtration Rate
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Population
Kidney Diseases
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Chronic Kidney Failure
Life Style
Health
Association reactions
Hypertension

Keywords

  • ApoA1
  • eGFR decline
  • HDL-C
  • Metabolic syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

@article{9aa82eaf84e14989bd38258cc2163b5c,
title = "Investigation of metabolic factors associated with eGFR decline over 1 year in a Japanese population without CKD",
abstract = "Aim: Early intervention before the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is essential to prevent end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and cardiovascular complications. This study evaluated the correlation between metabolic and lifestyle-related factors and the decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over 1 year in a Japanese population without CKD. Methods: Subjects who received two consecutive annual health checkups from 2013 to 2015 were involved. Factors associated with eGFR decline were identified using multiple regression models. Results: A total of 2531 subjects aged 58.9±11.7 years old were included in this study. Baseline levels of HDL-C and ApoA1 correlated with the eGFR decline over 1 year defined as eGFR reduction rate of 15{\%} or more and/or eGFR at the next year <60 ml/min/m2 (odds ratio (OR) 0.87 (per 10 mg/dl); 95{\%} CI, 0.80–0.94; p=0.0012, 0.90 (per 10 mg/dl); 0.86–0.96; p=0.0004, respectively). A U-shaped relationship between the eGFR decline and HDL-C or ApoA1 levels was not observed in non-CKD population of this study. Metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with eGFR decline (OR 1.32; 1.04–1.67; p=0.0205), although obesity-related factors did not show a significant correlation with eGFR decline over 1 year. Conclusion: Low HDL-C and ApoA1 levels significantly correlated with eGFR decline in a short period of 1 year. Metabolic syndrome also showed a significant association with eGFR decline. This study suggests the importance of hypertension and low HDL-C in the metabolic syndrome effect on eGFR decline rather than obesity in non-CKD population.",
keywords = "ApoA1, eGFR decline, HDL-C, Metabolic syndrome",
author = "Kaori Hayashi and Michiyo Takayama and Takayuki Abe and Takeshi Kanda and Hiroshi Hirose and Ryoko Shimizu and Eisuke Shiomi and Yasushi Iwao and Hiroshi Itoh",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.5551/jat.38612",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "863--875",
journal = "Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis",
issn = "1340-3478",
publisher = "Japan Atherosclerosis Society",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Investigation of metabolic factors associated with eGFR decline over 1 year in a Japanese population without CKD

AU - Hayashi, Kaori

AU - Takayama, Michiyo

AU - Abe, Takayuki

AU - Kanda, Takeshi

AU - Hirose, Hiroshi

AU - Shimizu, Ryoko

AU - Shiomi, Eisuke

AU - Iwao, Yasushi

AU - Itoh, Hiroshi

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Aim: Early intervention before the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is essential to prevent end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and cardiovascular complications. This study evaluated the correlation between metabolic and lifestyle-related factors and the decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over 1 year in a Japanese population without CKD. Methods: Subjects who received two consecutive annual health checkups from 2013 to 2015 were involved. Factors associated with eGFR decline were identified using multiple regression models. Results: A total of 2531 subjects aged 58.9±11.7 years old were included in this study. Baseline levels of HDL-C and ApoA1 correlated with the eGFR decline over 1 year defined as eGFR reduction rate of 15% or more and/or eGFR at the next year <60 ml/min/m2 (odds ratio (OR) 0.87 (per 10 mg/dl); 95% CI, 0.80–0.94; p=0.0012, 0.90 (per 10 mg/dl); 0.86–0.96; p=0.0004, respectively). A U-shaped relationship between the eGFR decline and HDL-C or ApoA1 levels was not observed in non-CKD population of this study. Metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with eGFR decline (OR 1.32; 1.04–1.67; p=0.0205), although obesity-related factors did not show a significant correlation with eGFR decline over 1 year. Conclusion: Low HDL-C and ApoA1 levels significantly correlated with eGFR decline in a short period of 1 year. Metabolic syndrome also showed a significant association with eGFR decline. This study suggests the importance of hypertension and low HDL-C in the metabolic syndrome effect on eGFR decline rather than obesity in non-CKD population.

AB - Aim: Early intervention before the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is essential to prevent end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and cardiovascular complications. This study evaluated the correlation between metabolic and lifestyle-related factors and the decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over 1 year in a Japanese population without CKD. Methods: Subjects who received two consecutive annual health checkups from 2013 to 2015 were involved. Factors associated with eGFR decline were identified using multiple regression models. Results: A total of 2531 subjects aged 58.9±11.7 years old were included in this study. Baseline levels of HDL-C and ApoA1 correlated with the eGFR decline over 1 year defined as eGFR reduction rate of 15% or more and/or eGFR at the next year <60 ml/min/m2 (odds ratio (OR) 0.87 (per 10 mg/dl); 95% CI, 0.80–0.94; p=0.0012, 0.90 (per 10 mg/dl); 0.86–0.96; p=0.0004, respectively). A U-shaped relationship between the eGFR decline and HDL-C or ApoA1 levels was not observed in non-CKD population of this study. Metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with eGFR decline (OR 1.32; 1.04–1.67; p=0.0205), although obesity-related factors did not show a significant correlation with eGFR decline over 1 year. Conclusion: Low HDL-C and ApoA1 levels significantly correlated with eGFR decline in a short period of 1 year. Metabolic syndrome also showed a significant association with eGFR decline. This study suggests the importance of hypertension and low HDL-C in the metabolic syndrome effect on eGFR decline rather than obesity in non-CKD population.

KW - ApoA1

KW - eGFR decline

KW - HDL-C

KW - Metabolic syndrome

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U2 - 10.5551/jat.38612

DO - 10.5551/jat.38612

M3 - Article

C2 - 28123142

AN - SCOPUS:85026789214

VL - 24

SP - 863

EP - 875

JO - Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis

JF - Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis

SN - 1340-3478

IS - 8

ER -