Is event-related desynchronization a biomarker representing corticospinal excitability?

Mitsuaki Takemi, Yoshihisa Masakado, Meigen Liu, Junichi Ushiba

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) using event-related desynchronization (ERD) of the electroencephalogram (EEG), which is believed to represent increased activation of the sensorimotor cortex, have attracted attention as tools for rehabilitation of upper limb motor functions in hemiplegic stroke patients. However, it remains unclear whether the corticospinal excitability is actually correlated with ERD. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between the ERD magnitude and the excitability of primary motor cortex (M1) and spinal motoneurons. M1 excitability was tested by motor evoked potentials (MEPs), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) using transcranial magnetic stimulation, and spinal motoneuronal excitability was tested by F-waves using peripheral nerve stimulation. Results showed that large ERD during motor imagery was associated with significantly increased F-wave persistence and reduced SICI, but no significant changes in ICF and the response average of F-wave amplitudes. Our findings suggest that ERD magnitude during motor imagery represents the instantaneous excitability of both M1 and spinal motoneurons. This study provides electrophysiological evidence that ERD-based BCI with motor imagery task increases corticospinal excitability as changes accompanying actual movements.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
Pages281-284
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013 - Osaka, Japan
Duration: 2013 Jul 32013 Jul 7

Other

Other2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013
CountryJapan
CityOsaka
Period13/7/313/7/7

Fingerprint

Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Biomarkers
Brain-Computer Interfaces
Motor Neurons
Motor Evoked Potentials
Brain computer interface
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Motor Cortex
Peripheral Nerves
Upper Extremity
Electroencephalography
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Bioelectric potentials
Patient rehabilitation
Chemical activation
Association reactions
Inhibition (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Takemi, M., Masakado, Y., Liu, M., & Ushiba, J. (2013). Is event-related desynchronization a biomarker representing corticospinal excitability? In Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS (pp. 281-284). [6609492] https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2013.6609492

Is event-related desynchronization a biomarker representing corticospinal excitability? / Takemi, Mitsuaki; Masakado, Yoshihisa; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi.

Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS. 2013. p. 281-284 6609492.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Takemi, M, Masakado, Y, Liu, M & Ushiba, J 2013, Is event-related desynchronization a biomarker representing corticospinal excitability? in Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS., 6609492, pp. 281-284, 2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013, Osaka, Japan, 13/7/3. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2013.6609492
Takemi M, Masakado Y, Liu M, Ushiba J. Is event-related desynchronization a biomarker representing corticospinal excitability? In Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS. 2013. p. 281-284. 6609492 https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2013.6609492
Takemi, Mitsuaki ; Masakado, Yoshihisa ; Liu, Meigen ; Ushiba, Junichi. / Is event-related desynchronization a biomarker representing corticospinal excitability?. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS. 2013. pp. 281-284
@inproceedings{89c4a9f827d041a28f9cf52b2512d5bc,
title = "Is event-related desynchronization a biomarker representing corticospinal excitability?",
abstract = "Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) using event-related desynchronization (ERD) of the electroencephalogram (EEG), which is believed to represent increased activation of the sensorimotor cortex, have attracted attention as tools for rehabilitation of upper limb motor functions in hemiplegic stroke patients. However, it remains unclear whether the corticospinal excitability is actually correlated with ERD. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between the ERD magnitude and the excitability of primary motor cortex (M1) and spinal motoneurons. M1 excitability was tested by motor evoked potentials (MEPs), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) using transcranial magnetic stimulation, and spinal motoneuronal excitability was tested by F-waves using peripheral nerve stimulation. Results showed that large ERD during motor imagery was associated with significantly increased F-wave persistence and reduced SICI, but no significant changes in ICF and the response average of F-wave amplitudes. Our findings suggest that ERD magnitude during motor imagery represents the instantaneous excitability of both M1 and spinal motoneurons. This study provides electrophysiological evidence that ERD-based BCI with motor imagery task increases corticospinal excitability as changes accompanying actual movements.",
author = "Mitsuaki Takemi and Yoshihisa Masakado and Meigen Liu and Junichi Ushiba",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1109/EMBC.2013.6609492",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781457702167",
pages = "281--284",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Is event-related desynchronization a biomarker representing corticospinal excitability?

AU - Takemi, Mitsuaki

AU - Masakado, Yoshihisa

AU - Liu, Meigen

AU - Ushiba, Junichi

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) using event-related desynchronization (ERD) of the electroencephalogram (EEG), which is believed to represent increased activation of the sensorimotor cortex, have attracted attention as tools for rehabilitation of upper limb motor functions in hemiplegic stroke patients. However, it remains unclear whether the corticospinal excitability is actually correlated with ERD. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between the ERD magnitude and the excitability of primary motor cortex (M1) and spinal motoneurons. M1 excitability was tested by motor evoked potentials (MEPs), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) using transcranial magnetic stimulation, and spinal motoneuronal excitability was tested by F-waves using peripheral nerve stimulation. Results showed that large ERD during motor imagery was associated with significantly increased F-wave persistence and reduced SICI, but no significant changes in ICF and the response average of F-wave amplitudes. Our findings suggest that ERD magnitude during motor imagery represents the instantaneous excitability of both M1 and spinal motoneurons. This study provides electrophysiological evidence that ERD-based BCI with motor imagery task increases corticospinal excitability as changes accompanying actual movements.

AB - Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) using event-related desynchronization (ERD) of the electroencephalogram (EEG), which is believed to represent increased activation of the sensorimotor cortex, have attracted attention as tools for rehabilitation of upper limb motor functions in hemiplegic stroke patients. However, it remains unclear whether the corticospinal excitability is actually correlated with ERD. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between the ERD magnitude and the excitability of primary motor cortex (M1) and spinal motoneurons. M1 excitability was tested by motor evoked potentials (MEPs), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) using transcranial magnetic stimulation, and spinal motoneuronal excitability was tested by F-waves using peripheral nerve stimulation. Results showed that large ERD during motor imagery was associated with significantly increased F-wave persistence and reduced SICI, but no significant changes in ICF and the response average of F-wave amplitudes. Our findings suggest that ERD magnitude during motor imagery represents the instantaneous excitability of both M1 and spinal motoneurons. This study provides electrophysiological evidence that ERD-based BCI with motor imagery task increases corticospinal excitability as changes accompanying actual movements.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84886576256&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84886576256&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/EMBC.2013.6609492

DO - 10.1109/EMBC.2013.6609492

M3 - Conference contribution

C2 - 24109679

AN - SCOPUS:84886576256

SN - 9781457702167

SP - 281

EP - 284

BT - Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS

ER -