Japan's radical reform of long-term care

John Creighton Campbell, Naoki Ikegami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Japan's mandatory long-term care social insurance system started in 2000. Many important choices about the basic shape and size of the system, as well as a host of details, were necessary when the program was being planned. It represents a reversal from earlier steps toward a tax-based direct-service system, and is based on consumer choice of services and providers. The benefits are in the form of institutional or community-based services, not cash, and are aimed at covering all caregiving costs (less a 10 percent co-payment) at six levels of need, as measured by objective test. Revenues are from insurance contributions and taxes. The program costs about $40 billion, and is expected to rise to about $70 billion annually by 2010 as applications for services go up. There are about 2.2 million beneficiaries, about 10 percent of the 65+ population. The program has operated within its budget and without major problems for two years and is broadly accepted as an appropriate and effective social program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-34
Number of pages14
JournalSocial Policy and Administration
Volume37
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Feb

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Japan
reform
insurance contribution
insurance system
long-term care insurance
caregiving
costs
cost
taxes
revenue
budget
programme
services
community
tax

Keywords

  • Japan
  • Long-term care insurance
  • Social policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Development

Cite this

Campbell, J. C., & Ikegami, N. (2003). Japan's radical reform of long-term care. Social Policy and Administration, 37(1), 21-34.

Japan's radical reform of long-term care. / Campbell, John Creighton; Ikegami, Naoki.

In: Social Policy and Administration, Vol. 37, No. 1, 02.2003, p. 21-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Campbell, JC & Ikegami, N 2003, 'Japan's radical reform of long-term care', Social Policy and Administration, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 21-34.
Campbell JC, Ikegami N. Japan's radical reform of long-term care. Social Policy and Administration. 2003 Feb;37(1):21-34.
Campbell, John Creighton ; Ikegami, Naoki. / Japan's radical reform of long-term care. In: Social Policy and Administration. 2003 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 21-34.
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