Lack of social support and social trust as potential risk factors for dry eye disease: JPHC-NEXT study

for the JPHC-NEXT Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate whether social support and social trust are associated with DED. Methods: Cross-sectional data from the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study for the Next Generation (JPHC-NEXT) were used. Subjects are 96,227 Japanese men and women aged 40 to 74. Data from respondents included information on DED, social support and social trust. DED was defined as the presence of clinically diagnosed DED or severe symptoms. Social support was measured by emotional support and tangible support. Social trust was measured by level of general trust in others. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the association of social determinants for DED. Results: Individuals with high levels of social support and social trust were less likely to have severe symptoms of DED and clinically diagnosed DED (P for trend < 0.001 in both cases). Those with the highest levels of social support and social trust were least likely to have DED (odds ratios [OR] = 0.64 [0.61–0.67], 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.63 [0.60–0.67] for severe symptoms of DED; OR = 0.88 [0.83–0.93] and 0.85 [0.80–0.91] for clinically diagnosed DED). Conclusions: High levels of social support and social trust were associated with a lower prevalence of DED.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)278-284
Number of pages7
JournalOcular Surface
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Apr 1

Fingerprint

Eye Diseases
Social Support
Odds Ratio
Japan
Public Health
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Dry eye disease
  • Social support
  • Social trust

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Lack of social support and social trust as potential risk factors for dry eye disease : JPHC-NEXT study. / for the JPHC-NEXT Study Group.

In: Ocular Surface, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 278-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: To investigate whether social support and social trust are associated with DED. Methods: Cross-sectional data from the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study for the Next Generation (JPHC-NEXT) were used. Subjects are 96,227 Japanese men and women aged 40 to 74. Data from respondents included information on DED, social support and social trust. DED was defined as the presence of clinically diagnosed DED or severe symptoms. Social support was measured by emotional support and tangible support. Social trust was measured by level of general trust in others. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the association of social determinants for DED. Results: Individuals with high levels of social support and social trust were less likely to have severe symptoms of DED and clinically diagnosed DED (P for trend < 0.001 in both cases). Those with the highest levels of social support and social trust were least likely to have DED (odds ratios [OR] = 0.64 [0.61–0.67], 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 0.63 [0.60–0.67] for severe symptoms of DED; OR = 0.88 [0.83–0.93] and 0.85 [0.80–0.91] for clinically diagnosed DED). Conclusions: High levels of social support and social trust were associated with a lower prevalence of DED.",
keywords = "Dry eye disease, Social support, Social trust",
author = "{for the JPHC-NEXT Study Group} and {Viet Vu}, {Chi Hoang} and Miki Uchino and Motoko Kawashima and Kenya Yuki and Kazuo Tsubota and Akihiro Nishi and German, {Christopher A.} and Kiyomi Sakata and Kozo Tanno and Hiroyasu Iso and Kazumasa Yamagishi and Nobufumi Yasuda and Isao Saito and Tadahiro Kato and Kazuhiko Arima and Yoshihito Tomita and Taichi Shimazu and Taiki Yamaji and Atsushi Goto and Manami Inoue and Motoki Iwasaki and Norie Sawada and Shoichiro Tsugane",
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AU - Viet Vu, Chi Hoang

AU - Uchino, Miki

AU - Kawashima, Motoko

AU - Yuki, Kenya

AU - Tsubota, Kazuo

AU - Nishi, Akihiro

AU - German, Christopher A.

AU - Sakata, Kiyomi

AU - Tanno, Kozo

AU - Iso, Hiroyasu

AU - Yamagishi, Kazumasa

AU - Yasuda, Nobufumi

AU - Saito, Isao

AU - Kato, Tadahiro

AU - Arima, Kazuhiko

AU - Tomita, Yoshihito

AU - Shimazu, Taichi

AU - Yamaji, Taiki

AU - Goto, Atsushi

AU - Inoue, Manami

AU - Iwasaki, Motoki

AU - Sawada, Norie

AU - Tsugane, Shoichiro

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